corrosion


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cor·ro·sion

(kŏ-rō'zhŭn),
1. Gradual deterioration or consummation of a substance by another, especially by biochemical or chemical reaction. Compare: erosion.
2. The product of corroding, such as rust.
[L. cor-rodo (conr-), pp. -rosus, to gnaw]

corrosion

[kərō′zhen]
a result of an oxidation-reduction reaction, or deterioration of a substance by a destructive agent. See also corrosive.

cor·ro·sion

(kŏr-ō'zhŭn)
1. Gradual deterioration or consummation of a substance by another, especially by biochemical or chemical reaction.
2. That produced by corroding.
[L. cor-rodo (conr-), pp. -rosus, to gnaw]

corrosion,

n an electrolytic or chemical attack of a surface. Usually refers to the attack of a metal surface.
References in periodicals archive ?
From the LPR test, the corrosion resistance evaluated are shown in table 2 and figure 3.
When a large wastewater treatment facility in Texas sought to control corrosion in a number of mild steel equalization tanks, for instance, the status quo was unsatisfactory.
There is a need to discuss with chemical treatment and corrosion-monitoring personnel at the time of design and construction to plan for a better facility to corrosion monitoring.
For oil and gas producing operations, there is no escaping the challenge of corrosion; steel is susceptible to corrosion and the harsher the environment, the more accelerated the corrosion process becomes.
The influences of cover thickness and water cement ratio on steel corrosion in reinforced concrete under freeze-thaw environment are also discussed, and the cover thickness is, respectively, 15 mm and 30 mm.
Corrosion at metallic vessels is usually a combination of different processes [1].
Based on the results, corrosion resistance of the nanostructure stainless steel 316L is about 4 times higher than its microstructure form.
8226; Organic corrosion inhibitors were the most widely used product with demand exceeding 3,300 kilo tons in 2013.
Annual costs of corrosion have been estimated at three trillion USD globally, of which approximately 25 per cent can be attributed to process industries, and power utilities.
The corrosion of metals in CCA treated-wood was studied by several researchers who found that it was more corrosive than untreated wood and suggested that at a minimum, hot-dip galvanized fasteners should be used in treated wood.