corroborating evidence

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corroborating evidence

generally, any evidence which tallies with the predictions of a hypothesis or theory. For the strict proponent of falsificationism, however, only a prediction unique to the theory concerned corroborates it.
References in periodicals archive ?
CORROBORATION STANDARDS FOR ASYLUM CLAIMS: A HISTORY OF TENSION AND INCONSISTENCY A.
Justice Secretary Michael Matheson announced he would halt moves to scrap the centuries-old rule of corroboration, which ensures evidence comes from more than one source.
Two of these doctrines, the corroboration rule and the destructive contradictions doctrine, existed in Missouri until the summer of 2014.
The need for corroboration has been cited as one of the key reasons Scotland has a poor conviction rate for rape.
If anyone still believes that the health service is safe in Labour hands, look only to Wales for corroboration that it certainly is not.
Dataminr CEO Ted Bailey said that the system was designed to examine things like whether there is corroboration for a report.
This project aims to strengthen aimed at consolidating the outer limit of the continental shelf Argentina national capacities, performing the technical tasks necessary to obtain supporting data and corroboration for an adequate defense of Argentina%s presentation, as well as disseminating and promoting the theme of the outer limit of the continental shelf.
Bahrain feels that financial corroboration on an almost daily basis.
If you analyze the process of cognitive input in each respective venue: With the Internet, it has information from multiple sources, but a lack of corroboration between sources and a lack of culpability for the purveyor of the information.
A In general terms the prosecution can still prove an offence of speeding based upon the opinion of police officers provided there is come corroboration from a second witness or machine, usually a speedometer.
As the exception tentatively emerged from the common law fog of res gestae, its proponents disarmed critics by emphasizing the inevitability of corroboration.
Although Reesman argues that London avoided the Exotic bias prevalent then, the portraits seem rather images in which racist viewers would find corroboration.