corridor

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corridor

a connection between land masses or habitats which allows animals to pass between different faunal regions or fragmented habitats.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Ministry is a political satire set in contemporary India's corridors of power and is set to launch globally in 2018 on Amazon Prime Video, read a statement.
The more likely truth is that those same bureaucrats are running around the corridors of power trying to find someone to blame for this appalling mess.
But all too frequently the real pain is felt by those who live outside the corridors of power.
Spurs boss Harry Redknapp is the favourite but I'm told he's not a certainty to take over because Trevor Brooking, who has plenty of influence in the FA corridors of power, would prefer someone else.
ISLAMABAD, December 11, 2011 (Frontier Star): PML-Q President Chaudhry Shujat Hussain Saturday ruled out possibility of martial law in the country saying army has no desire to come to corridors of power.
The need to include the business community acquires added importance because its representative bodies, such as Karachi Chamber of Commerce and Industry and FPCCI are politically motivated and are reluctant to annoy their masters in the corridors of power, they said.
Those who are sitting in corridors of power are the killers of his father as they had supported military operation in Dera Bugti, he added.
Fighting the worst recession in decades, keeping an eye on the Iranian pressure cooker and leading the free world must be difficult enough without opportunist crazies from overseas clogging up the corridors of power with crates of weird vegetable smoothie.
WESTMINSTER BLOG Political correspondent Kevin Schofield on a day of drama in the corridors of power.
It is stalking the corridors of power, hitching up its skirt, delighted to be asked, and wives who try to forget it are nuts" - Life in the House of Commons by former Tory MP: Edwina Currie who famously had an affair with John Major.
They have the luxury of walking in the corridors of power, of voting on their own pay and conditions, of deciding what hours they work, of deciding the length of each holiday or recess they have several times a year, their severance payment if/when they get voted out of office and of course their pensions when they retire.