correlation coefficient


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

coefficient

 [ko″ĕ-fish´ent]
1. an expression of the change or effect produced by the variation in certain variables, or of the ratio between two different quantities.
2. in chemistry, a number or figure put before a chemical formula to indicate how many times the formula is to be multiplied.
Bunsen coefficient the number of milliliters of gas dissolved in a milliliter of liquid at atmospheric pressure (760 mm Hg) and a specified temperature. Symbol, α.
confidence coefficient the probability that a confidence interval will contain the true value of the population parameter. For example, if the confidence coefficient is 0.95, 95 per cent of the confidence intervals so calculated for a large number of random samples would contain the parameter.
correlation coefficient a numerical value that indicates the degree and direction of relationship between two variables; the coefficients range in value from +1.00 (perfect positive relationship) to 0.00 (no relationship) to −1.00 (perfect negative or inverse relationship).
diffusion coefficient see diffusion coefficient.
coefficient of digestibility the proportion of a food that is digested compared to what is absorbed, expressed as a percentage.
dilution coefficient a number that expresses the effectiveness of a disinfectant for a given organism. It is calculated by the equation tcn = k, where t is the time required for killing all organisms, c is the concentration of disinfectant, n is the dilution coefficient, and k is a constant. A low coefficient indicates the disinfectant is effective at a low concentration.
linear absorption coefficient the fraction of a beam of radiation absorbed per unit thickness of absorber.
mass absorption coefficient the linear absorption coefficient divided by the density of the absorber.
phenol coefficient see phenol coefficient.
sedimentation coefficient the velocity at which a particle sediments in a centrifuge divided by the applied centrifugal field, the result having units of time (velocity divided by acceleration), usually expressed in Svedberg units (S), which equal 10−13 second. Sedimentation coefficients are used to characterize the size of macromolecules; they increase with increasing mass and density and are higher for globular than for fibrous particles.

cor·re·la·tion co·ef·fi·cient

a measure of association that indicates the degree to which two variables have a linear relationship; this coefficient, represented by the letter r, can vary between +1 and -1; when r = +1, there is a perfect positive linear relationship in which one variable relates directly with the other; when r = -1, there is a perfect negative linear relationship between the variables.

cor·re·la·tion co·ef·fi·cient

(kōrĕ-lāshŭn kōĕ-fishĕnt)
Measure of association that indicates the degree to which two variables have a linear relationship.

cor·re·la·tion co·ef·fi·cient

(kōrĕ-lā shŭn kōĕ-fishĕnt)
Measure of association that indicates degree to which two variables have a linear relationship.
References in periodicals archive ?
The analysis of the process can be simplified by using the correlative heritability instead of the genetic correlation coefficient, and results are more convincing.
During the course of building the hyperspectral inversion models of soil salinity, characteristic bands usually chose based on the correlation coefficient between reflectance data and soil salt content or EC; the higher the correlation coefficient, the more sensitive the band is.
The correlation coefficients obtained between (a *) and the other parameters are shown in Table 4.
With these results, it is possible to calculate new (partial) correlation coefficients, defined as the square roots of the products of the corresponding pairwise regression coefficients.
Finally, the envelope correlation coefficient is calculated from:
Our initial idea is to find the correlation coefficient for corresponding points of each rectangle.
Late integration of Canada into the main cluster was probably due to the high value of the correlation coefficient of the interest rate.
The simple correlation coefficient bilateral (two-tail) Talent development Organizational Commitment Pearson's correlation coefficient 0.829 Significant level.
(12) Joan Mateo Andres in Bisquerra (2004) proposes that correlation studies include those studies in which we describe or clarify existing relations between the most meaningful variables of a phenomenon through the use of correlation coefficients.
If the correlation coefficient equals zero, the symbols observed do not correlate (there is no linear relationship).
If, however, the dependence between the variables is non-linear, the correlation coefficient is no longer a suitable measure for their dependence.