corrected age


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corrected age

The age of a premature baby revised so that it accurately reflects his or her premature delivery. It can be calculated in one of two ways. First, a baby's weeks of prematurity can be subtracted from his or her age since birth. Using this system a child who was four weeks premature, who is now four weeks and one day old would have a corrected age of one day. Alternatively, a child who was born at a gestational age of 27 weeks who is now three weeks old would have a corrected (gestational) age of 30 weeks.
See also: age
References in periodicals archive ?
Weight at 1 year corrected age, g###8396+-1044###8533+-1212###0.48
This study was designed with an objective to compare the morbidity of ELBW babies versus VLBW babies at birth and to compare the growth of VLBW babies versus ELBW babies till one year of corrected age.
"There was no significant difference between a lower SpO2 target range compared with a higher SpO2 target range on the primary composite outcome of death or major disability at a corrected age of 18 to 24 months," the authors write.
After 9 to 15 months of corrected age 40 infants in sepsis and 54 infants in control group were evaluated.
To collect information regarding the feeding development, video recordings were used when preterm infants were at 37 weeks of corrected age, at 40 weeks of corrected age, every two weeks up to 3 months of corrected age, and once a month until chewing skills appeared.
"0" if the infant at the final evaluation, at two years corrected age, maintained the same risk category, (L/M/S)
Developmental outcome was then assessed for both groups at 24 months' corrected age using the Bayley Scales of Infant Development 2nd Edition (BSID-II) [10].
However, reporting the corrected age at which the babies switched to oral feeding (as the reader stated) in the part of comparison of the introductory properties of the babies would contribute to the study.
In this study involving 100 infants in China findings showed that after hospital discharge most infants achieved catch-up growth by one month corrected age.
Additionally, researchers found that by 18 to 22 months corrected age, 40% of VLBW and ELBW infants had lengths, head circumferences, and weights less than the 10th percentile (Dusick et al., 2003), and by 2, 5, 8, 14, and 20 years of age, ELBW infants' height z-scores were significantly below 0 in comparison to term infants (Doyle, Faber, Callanan, Ford, & Davis, 2004).
More specifically, a low free thyroxine at 2 and 4 weeks was associated with poorer attention skills at 3 months of corrected age as assessed by the Bayley Scales of Infant Development, Second Edition.