corpse


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ca·dav·er

(kă-dav'er),
A dead body. [Usage note: In common use, this term has come to specify a dead body used for a particular purpose, such as dissection.]
Synonym(s): corpse
[L. fr. cado, to fall]

corpse

(kôrps)
n.
A dead body, especially the dead body of a human.

corpse

[kôrps]
Etymology: L, corpus, body
the body of a dead human being.

ca·dav·er

(kă-dav'ĕr)
A dead body.
Synonym(s): corpse.
[L. fr. cado, to fall]
References in classic literature ?
One of the last corpses to pass him was still clothed in the white robe of a Wieroo, blood-stained over the headless neck that it concealed.
When night came, he would return and fetch An-Tak this far at least; but in the meantime it was his intention to reconnoiter in the hope that he might discover some easier way out of the city than that offered by the chill, black channel of the ghastly river of corpses.
Instantly there flashed into his memory the circular openings in the roof of the river vault and the corpses he had seen drop from them to the water beneath.
I entered the room where the corpse lay and was led up to the coffin.
Qadir Baksh after killing his wife tried to bury her corpse however the police timely reached the site and foiled his attempt.
Exquisite Corpse Games will be making its first stop after its one night unveiling at the Museum of Fine Arts St.
So every time, we stayed wide awake into the wee hours, singing happy songs, tossing cards, even joshing kids with cheap scares that the corpse stealers were out to get them.
Residents of Kawasaki are unhappy about living next to Sousou's hidden corpse refugees, with placards and flags dotting the neighbourhood expressing outrage at the presence of the morgue.
According to police sources, police had recovered an unknown corpse from the field 20 days back which was thrown into the field after killing him.
WASHINGTON (TAP) - The Pentagon has launched an investigation into photos released Wednesday that purport to show troops burning corpses in Fallujah, Iraq, a spokesman said.
The Golden Corpse stories were originally composed by the great Indian Buddhist philosopher Nagarjuna in Sanskrit.
For Noble, writers in the period invoke both the strangeness as well as the normalcy of corpse pharmacology to mediate issues that arise in a variety of spheres--religious, political, legal, and colonial--and emerge in a range of genres, including poetry, prose, tragedy, and tragicomedy.