corporeal

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cor·po·re·al

(kōr-pō'rē-ăl), Distinguish this word from corporal. Avoid the mispronunciation corpore'al.
Pertaining to the body, or to a corpus.

cor·po·re·al

(kōr-pōr'ē-ăl)
Pertaining to the body, or to a corpus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Whereas Brabantio's use of the phrase is meant to evoke an image of integrity breached, two other uses aim at describing or, what is more, effecting a psychological change, conceived of corporeally. Upon his arrival in Cyprus, Lodovico wonders at Othello's treatment of Desdemona saying "Is it his use?
(4.) Wallace's argument relies on still images and plays with the notion of "frames"; black characters are both corporeally and legally "framed" as criminals by the photographic white gaze of the dominant culture.
What gives the story its ability to affect the reader corporeally is precisely this focus on unspeakable, and therefore unforgettable, loss.
On the one hand, we have a body which corporeally and discursively signifies inequality and racism.
Consequently, they use their bodies to signify (and voice) both acceptance and rejection of contemporary education cultures, to announce their distinction while simultaneously stating corporeally that they do not and can not "belong".
(48) I certainly, however, would not wish to discount the imaginative power of a corporeally centered theatrical monologue.
(24) Robinson, following Wollstonecraft's lead, takes the tyranny argument as a given in her Letter to the Women of England, citing "the tyranny of man" as part and parcel of "the tyranny of custom," condensing Suetonius' history into a single fact: "the yoke of sexual tyranny." (25) This is not a strong link to the trial narratives, but the use in her Letter of an allusively legalized discourse to promote her view of women's present subjugation is: "Let WOMAN once assert her proper sphere, unshackled by prejudice, and unsophisticated by vanity; and pride, (the noblest species of pride,) will establish her claims to the participation of power, both mentally and corporeally" (2).
I will never touch Radio again and from now on I will consecrate myself exclusively to the theatre such as I conceive it a theatre of blood a theatre that, in every performance will have caused to gain corporeally something as much the one who performs as the one who comes to see performing besides one doesn't perform one acts theatre is in reality the genesis of creation ...
In this excerpt, a prison officer suggests that the best way to teach a prisoner the norms of a community is to have the prisoner "learn [them] on his body." (26) The passage is an interesting one because it is suggestive of a way in which the body is not simply a site for the enforcement of legal norms (although it is clearly that as well), but also a means by which legal norms may be corporeally enacted.
Corporeally, Gogodala see themselves as strong and fit; their bodies muscular, agile and light.
corporeally or psychologically, Clare unites Irene and Hugh in