corporeal

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cor·po·re·al

(kōr-pō'rē-ăl), Distinguish this word from corporal. Avoid the mispronunciation corpore'al.
Pertaining to the body, or to a corpus.

cor·po·re·al

(kōr-pōr'ē-ăl)
Pertaining to the body, or to a corpus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Moonlight Mask establishes better and more durable relationships over time; talking about different issues is what makes him different from the rest, and it is his sales strategy, the corporeality manifested through conversation, confidence, and company.
Essential to feminist argumentation of the female corporeality is an understanding of gender and sexuality.
In his desire to "produce [his] own meaning" in opposition to Iluvatar's plan, he becomes involved in the world in a physical way (122)--and thus is trapped in corporeality, unable to control or change his form after the downfall of Numenor.
Christopher Innes (University of Toronto) focused primarily on corporeality and the subversive ethics of performance in the comic characterisations offered by celebrated actor Mark Rylance in his roles of Byron in Jerusalem (2009) by Jez Butterworth and Valere in La bete (1999) by David Hirson.
The body and brain in their neurobiological dimension are, therefore, the premise of any learning process and, in particular, thought, emotion and memory are linked to the motor behavior of the individual, the primary language of corporeality. Therefore, if the organization of the didactic action must be based on strategies allowing the individual to learn efficiently, develop conceptual networks and stable but open knowledge, then it becomes necessary the corporeal involvement in the didactic activities.
The framing of humans as a geological force in the Anthropocene creates a geologic corporeality for humans as a collective surge on an inhuman scale: the social formation of what Michel Serres has called "the dense tectonic plates of humanity" (1995, page 16) capable of shifting geologic planetary processes.
What I missed in this otherwise cogent and convincing argument on the fundamental corporeality of the period's thought about politics, rhetoric, and theater was a slightly bigger picture--one that would allow us to understand how such thought would (or would not) become modern aesthetics.
Lukovitskaia; "Male Corporeality: Signs of Courage or a Statement of Excess?" by S.I.
The newest edition (Volume 22) to Berghahn Books outstanding 'Fertility, Reproduction and Sexuality' series, "Fatness and the Maternal Body: Women's Experiences of Corporeality and the Shaping of Social Policy" is a 248-page compendium that has been knowledgeably compiled and deftly edited by the team of academician Maya Unnithan-Kumar (Reader in Social Anthropology, University of Sussex, England) and social anthropologist Soraya Tremayne (Research Associate, Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, University of Oxford, England).
Through sin, humanity becomes visible as a body without glory: "the nakedness of pure corporeality, a concept Agamben borrows from Erik Peterson, to postulate that "denudation resulting in pure functionality, a body that lacks all nobility since its ultimate dignity lay in the divine glory now lost" ("Nudity" 59).
"We shall obey and adore in proportion as we apprehend the divine nature and love Him understandingly, warring no more over the corporeality, but rejoicing in the affluence of our God.