corporeal

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Related to corporeality: I'd, called off

cor·po·re·al

(kōr-pō'rē-ăl), Distinguish this word from corporal. Avoid the mispronunciation corpore'al.
Pertaining to the body, or to a corpus.

cor·po·re·al

(kōr-pōr'ē-ăl)
Pertaining to the body, or to a corpus.
References in periodicals archive ?
When I investigate a document's textual corporeality, I also spend time with the paper, not just what is written upon it but how and in what ways the writing was put down on the page: I explore its body.
For White, as for Kristeva, language and music harness corporeality in a movement toward signification that both creates and consumes.
We are our bodies, which is to say that we only come to be selves in and through the mediations and tacit dimensions (dark genesis) of our shared corporeality.
The book on Thoreau is also important in Cameron's figuring of the impersonal because it marks a shift from the idea of corporeality to the more radical understanding of depersonalization voiced in Impersonality.
In their pervasive depersonalization, this anonymous corporeality functions as an allegory of the elephantine, 'archaic,' and violent histories of external and internal subalterns.
Facticity discloses the embodiment of systemic evidence, the wavelength and amplitude of reality in its existential given-ness that informs corporeality.
Whatever the reasons for omitting O'Hara from this catalogue, Johns's ongoing investigation into process, experience, and corporeality throughout this period gains added resonance in light of the poet's anti-academic and -programmatic stance.
However, in contrast to the fields of body criticism in areas such as sociology, feminism, and literary criticism from the early-modern period to the nineteenth century, Irish studies remains largely starved of works related to corporeality.
Relying on a substantial survey of historical scholarship to trace the movement from Catholic to Reform notions of corporeality, Zimmerman explores Foxe and the Homily as two works that "reconceptualise the materiality of the body and of the corpse in self-conscious opposition to Catholic beliefs and practices" by "envisage[ing] its materiality, like that of the idol, as dead" (46).
Then she provides a wonderful reading of sonnet 130, where the lady's reeking breath becomes her speaking voice, and her solid corporeality as she "treads on the ground" transforms her to an "active human presence" (109).
2] In emphasising Fevvers' and Walser's "crises" of subjectivity this paper takes Bakhtin's theory of the carnivalesque rebirth as a means of reading Fevvers' corporeal excess and the ambivalence of her performativity as a destabilisation of the assumed causality between corporeality and ontology.
It is just such corporeality of salvation to which the indigenous churches of the Southern hemisphere appeal and that disembodied academic theology has to rediscover, as do all those churches that hail care for an "eternal soul" at the expense of the dissolving "temporal body" with all its "sinful desires.