corporal

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corporal

(kôr′pər-əl, kôr′prəl)
adj.
Of or relating to the body.

cor′po·ral′i·ty (-pə-răl′ĭ-tē) n.
cor′po·ral·ly adv.
References in periodicals archive ?
As Pickren (2014) might suggest, building a critical environmental health and corporality approach to e-waste risk in Agbogbloshie needs to "account for the absences and/or ambiguities of the law, particularly around exemptions and exclusions for certain materials as well as trade and labor conditions" (Pickren, 2014: 31).
One seeks a model to understand corporality by which it regains its dignity, so that the body should not be compelled to end as a corpse.
Keywords: Passion, knowledge, intentionality, objectivity, corporality.
The beauty to which Le Clezio refers in this passage is not a sexually charged superficial appreciation of female corporality, but instead it is the cosmos itself which is the veritable origin of the author's attraction.
In contrast, when Tere describes herself, she self-censors, which enables her to talk freely about her body through food imagery, which is just as effective as if she were discussing her corporality with standard terminology.
But just as Christian self-understanding holds contradictions based on ancestry within Judaism and self-differentiation from Judaism, Christian stereotypes of Judaism also suffer from a schizophrenic mentality: Judaism is identified as a "deficient-excessive physicality" which contrasts with the spiritual turn away from mere corporality found in Christianity, especially one given to allegorical analysis of scripture (p.
His topics include wolf biologists and nonfiction, the intermediate corporality of the average wolf, the sea wolf that crosses the water, the wolf discovering North America, lycanthropy and the werewolf race, the twins and the timber wolves, Jack London's dog stories, she-wolves and the woman warrior, and Cormac McCarthy's The Crossing.
Masculinity, Corporality and the English Stage is a solidly researched and much-needed re-evaluation of issues of gender and the body in the Early Modern English theatre It should be read by any scholar specialising in this area.
The actual presence of death in Keats's life and his study of death through and in the poetry must both be taken into consideration to apprehend Keats's "idea of death." When taken to the further extreme of what I will call his drive towards a posthumous poetics, this "idea of death" is made manifest in moments of strangely textual corporality or indeterminate animacy that allow the poet to bear witness to death within his own reality.
Contarini's essay also considers the contradictory discourse of corporality that characterizes the war-time writings of the Futurists, and of Marinetti in particular, in which the male body is transformed into a metallized, mechanical instrument, while the female body is re-consigned to the domain of nature, an animal form moved by lust and instinct.
It is a situated social theory that studies those "discursive practices" in the uncompromising and unsurpassable corporality of social relations, where cultural and symbolic struggles take place between different actors, in diverse regional Latin American spaces, and which point to a deeper interculturality, buried beneath the symbolic violence of colonial policies and, above all, the national policies of "racial mixing" (mestizaje) and/or "whitening".