corporal

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corporal

(kôr′pər-əl, kôr′prəl)
adj.
Of or relating to the body.

cor′po·ral′i·ty (-pə-răl′ĭ-tē) n.
cor′po·ral·ly adv.

corporal

of the body
References in periodicals archive ?
This is shown by the interest in corporality, financial success, social acknowledgement, prestige, etc.
Porphyry contrasts these two contradictory formulas to refine the notions of corporality, and to have access to the One-Good transcending oppositions.
In The Corporality of Architecture/The City as Terrain Emma Nilsson deals with the role of architecture in the production of bodily practices and terrains, and one of her examples is the birth of parkour in the suburb of Lisses outside Paris (Nilsson, 2010).
Thus the sexualities deployed in Gothic fiction are not illusory effects, but maps of the terrible and horrible projections of human corporality in a patriarchal culture.
That is to say, although often recast as a biomediation or assemblage, there is still a requirement, Blackman argues, to attend to this immaterial corporality and locate the subject of affect.
Perhaps the final blow to the medieval ideal of Sunni-Shi'a corporality came from the stroke of a pen belonging to one such European modernizer: In 1823, Ottoman officialdom added Iranians to its Register for Foreigners (Ecnebi Defterleri), a log that recorded incidents in the empire involving foreign persons.
GOD, BODY AND POETRY: THE INSCRIPTION OF CORPORALITY IN JACOBO FIJMAN AND HECTOR VIEL TEMPERLEY
As Napier sees it, questions about how meaning is embodied--and how corporality relates to and interferes with the expression of loftier ideas (aesthetic, spiritual, moral)--generate constant difficulties for authors of the period.
Mantel exploits this, along with Henry's seemingly boundless corporality, to create a character who subsumes everyone who comes within his orbit.
The corporality and dignity of the human person requires feeding these persons in a way that is proper to them.
Tearing the Body: Modern Self and Postmodern Corporality in Les Chants de Maldoror.
This shift back to the peripheral country then does not promote nation-building: Frits and Maria do not metaphorically bring together a new society, but rather cling to their colonial pasts, a past that can no longer exist, as the novel's end demonstrates through Frits's continuation of White privileges and Maria's reduction as a Black woman to her corporality as acted out in plantation societies.