corporal punishment

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corporal punishment

Public health The use of physical punishment–beating or other form of bodily injury to discipline children and control misbehavior. See Domestic violence. Cf Capital punishment.
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Attempts to cabin parental corporal punishment via a mens rea of truly disciplinary purpose or the like have not sufficiently limited it.
I argue that the forgiveness of parental corporal punishment is not just bad policy, but is also an overreading of the parental rights jurisprudence.
The main objective of this assignment is to offer alternative to avoid corporal punishment to achieve desired results and to provide feasible environment for learning process.
The point of views of both learners and instructors have been checked through interview and questionnaire either corporal punishment is good tool for learners and children or not.
Much as it has effected change in the realm of noncriminal corporal punishment, the democratic process likely would yield changes in the law of criminal punishments similar to those brought by the courts' doctrine of evolving standards of decency, but at a pace more consistent with the actual evolution of public standards of decency.
76) Thus, corporal punishment is permitted under the Eighth Amendment, and state legislatures are solely responsible for determining the legality of corporal punishment.
Yet corporal punishment of children persists--roughly fifty percent of the parents of toddlers (1) and sixty-five to sixty-eight percent of the parents of preschoolers (2) in the United States use corporal punishment as a regular method of disciplining their children.
One reason is its long tradition--the corporal punishment of children has occurred throughout the entirety of recorded history.
OTTAWA -- The Supreme Court of Canada says parents can spank children, who are older than two years of age and are not yet teenagers while teachers "may reasonably apply force to remove a child from the classroom or secure compliance with instructions, but not merely as corporal punishment.
The Court's decision stemmed from an appeal by the Canadian Foundation for Children, Youth and the Law, which wanted corporal punishment of children to be outlawed.
On a PIL filed by Bhanja earlier, the high court had banned all forms of corporal punishments in schools in 2004.
In 2009, the court had framed proper guidelines where it was observed that the students need to be counselled instead of handing out corporal punishment.