corporal punishment

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corporal punishment

Public health The use of physical punishment–beating or other form of bodily injury to discipline children and control misbehavior. See Domestic violence. Cf Capital punishment.
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She recommended that in order to avert corporal punishment in educational institutes, the education departments will establish a dedicated complaint cell to deal with the cases of corporal punishment.
Under the bill, the parent or guardian or the adult concerned who would be found handing corporal punishment to a minor shall be given a written citation by the barangay chairperson or his representative, saying the parent should stop from using corporal punishment for the first offense.
Starting from sexual abuse to corporal punishments or molestation at the hands of teachers or the preacher in a school or a Madrassa, in coming times very few might be left unbruised.
An overwhelming majority of the country's teachers believe in the usefulness of corporal punishment in schools, according to a study conducted by a not-for-profit organisation covering schools in both rural and urban areas.
This article addresses the impact of corporal punishment and its imprints on the 'psychological being' of a student.
He also claimed that students who suffer corporal punishment perform better.
OTTAWA -- The Supreme Court of Canada says parents can spank children, who are older than two years of age and are not yet teenagers while teachers "may reasonably apply force to remove a child from the classroom or secure compliance with instructions, but not merely as corporal punishment."
On a PIL filed by Bhanja earlier, the high court had banned all forms of corporal punishments in schools in 2004.
Attempts to cabin parental corporal punishment via a mens rea of truly disciplinary purpose or the like have not sufficiently limited it.
An examination of state laws indicates that states are increasingly banning corporal punishment, thereby rendering inconsequential judicial standards of decency.
Yet corporal punishment of children persists--roughly fifty percent of the parents of toddlers (1) and sixty-five to sixty-eight percent of the parents of preschoolers (2) in the United States use corporal punishment as a regular method of disciplining their children.
and aimed at the elimination of the practice of corporal punishment from the schools.