corporal punishment


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corporal punishment

Public health The use of physical punishment–beating or other form of bodily injury to discipline children and control misbehavior. See Domestic violence. Cf Capital punishment.
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If you take corporal punishment out of the schools, what are you left with?
Its consultation adds: "The prevailing view from child development experts, backed up by research, is that corporal punishment does not work and that other alternatives are more effective at teaching children the right sort of behaviour.
Many a time, even in the Arab region, people think that corporal punishment works and we argue with parents that corporal punishment does not work.
It is unrealistic for parents to never use corporal punishment to discipline
The American Correctional Association's standards for juvenile detention facilities "call for written policy, procedure, and practice [that] protect juveniles from personal abuse, corporal punishment, personal injury, disease, property damage, and harassment.
Parental corporal punishment has been surprisingly ignored in legal scholarship and policy reform.
In one corporal punishment state, the practice is decreasing, according to research done at the University of Arkansas by Kaitlin Anderson, a doctoral student at the university's education reform department, and professor Gary Ritter.
The main objective of this assignment is to offer alternative to avoid corporal punishment to achieve desired results and to provide feasible environment for learning process.
In his opinion, corporal punishment was indefensible.
Keywords: postpartum, depression, corporal punishment
WASHINGTON--The legal definition of what constitutes "reasonable" corporal punishment is contracting, making it more critical than ever to inquire about discipline, provide alternatives to corporal punishment, and address religious objections with culturally sensitive responses.
Foucault attributed the historical shift away from public torture and corporal punishment, which occurred during the 19th century, to the availability of new techniques of social control; however, corporal and capital punishment (what we term "shock punishment") persists in many penal systems to this day, suggesting that these countries have for some reason not fully undergone this penal evolution.