coronavirus

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coronavirus

 [ko-ro´nah-vi″rus]
any of a group of morphologically similar, ether-sensitive viruses, probably RNA, causing infectious bronchitis in birds, hepatitis in mice, gastroenteritis in swine, and respiratory infections in humans.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

Co·ro·na·vi·rus

(kō-rō'nă-vī'rŭs),
A genus in the family Coronaviridae that is associated with upper respiratory tract infections and possibly gastroenteritis in humans.

co·ro·na·vi·rus

(kō-rō'nă-vī'rŭs),
Any virus of the family Coronaviridae.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

coronavirus

(kə-rō′nə-vī′rəs)
n.
Any of a family of single-stranded RNA viruses that infect mammals and birds, causing respiratory infections such as the common cold and SARS in humans, and that have spikes of glycoproteins projecting from the viral envelope.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

coronavirus

Virology The single genus of the family Coronaviridae, which have a corona or halo-like appearance by EM; coronaviruses cause RTIs , common cold, and severe acute respiratory syndrome. See SARS.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Co·ro·na·vi·rus

(kō-rō'nă-vī'rŭs)
A genus in the family Coronaviridae that is associated with upper respiratory tract infections and possibly gastroenteritis in humans.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

coronavirus

Any one of a group of RNA-containing viruses that can cause infections of the respiratory tract in mammals and birds.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Coronavirus

One of a family of RNA-containing viruses known to cause severe respiratory illnesses. In March 2003, a previously unknown coronavirus was identified as the causative agent of severe acute respiratory syndrome, or SARS.
Mentioned in: Common Cold, Pneumonia
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Falsey, "Clinical impact of human coronaviruses 229E and OC43 infection in diverse adult populations," Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol.
In this study, we successfully analyzed the complete genome of 2 strains of FRECV, FRCoV4370 and FRCoV063, and found that they shared 94.0% nucleotide identity with each other but 49.9%-68.9% nucleotide identities with other known CoVs, suggesting that the ferret coronaviruses might be classified as a new species in the genus Alphacoronavirus.
The genome sequence shows that the coronavirus is moderately related to the other family of coronaviruses which includes HCoVOC43 and HCoV-229E.
Coronaviruses are RNA-based viruses that look like a crown, or corona, under an electron microscope.
Serological assays for emerging coronaviruses: Challenges and pitfalls.
Genetic sequence analyses have shown that this new virus is different from any other known human coronaviruses, including the one that caused severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) (2).
epidemiologist Jonathan Epstein, D.V.M., led a team that surveyed bats from the Bisha area last fall to see if they could find coronaviruses similar to NCoV.
"Everywhere you look in bats there seem to be one or two new coronaviruses, but most bat coronaviruses are not SARS-like.
Coronaviruses cause of the common cold but can result in more severe illnesses including Sars (severe acute respiratory syndrome).
Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses, with different members of the "family" causing illness in humans and animals.
Currently, coronaviruses (CoVs) with genetic and antigenic proximities to bovine coronavirus (BCoV) such as human coronaviruses HCoV-OC43, porcine hemagglutinating encephalomyelitis virus (PHEV), and equine coronavirus (EqCoV) are not considered to be separate species but as belonging to the species Betacoronavirus-1 within the genus Betacoronavirus.