coronary veins

coronary veins

The vessels that drain blood from the heart muscle, joining to form a vein that empties into the right ATRIUM.
References in periodicals archive ?
1977) stated that Pratt (1898) postulated that the myocardium was maintained not only by arterial flow but also by thebesian vessels and backflow through the coronary veins.
These include unsuitable branching angle of coronary veins and tortuosity of coronary sinus anatomy, postoperative deformation, presence of venous valves, absence of vessel in target location, and coronary venous stenosis (2, 3).
However, there are some limitations preventing optimal lead implantation to target vein such as branching and tortuosity of coronary veins, postoperative deformation, presence of venous valves, and venous stenosis (2, 3).
During the procedure, guiding catheter was engaged into the coronary sinus ostium, and coronary venography was undertaken to choose target coronary vein for left ventricular lead insertion.
No matter how badly diseased a patient's coronary arteries are, the coronary veins remain disease free.
And particularly on the left side of the heart, the coronary veins parallel the major epicardial arteries.
The Corox OTW S-BP offers a unique, threaded silicone fixation mechanism that allows the lead to attach itself in even very narrow or very short coronary veins, the most problematic vessels for conventional leads,
The Corox OTW BP offers a proprietary Progressive Curve Helix that expands much like a stent, enabling the lead to achieve stable fixation in a wide range of coronary veins, including very large-diameter vessels,
There are several other techniques for placement of the LV lead inside the sharply-angulated/tortuous coronary veins.
A successful implant typically involves placement of the LV lead in a posterolateral or anterolateral coronary vein with good lead stability, adequate thresholds without phrenic nerve stimulation.
The lead features an "over-the-wire" design that enables implantation using either a guidewire or stylet in the coronary veins overlying the left ventricle of the heart.
Radlick, "for example a large percentage of the over 5 million people who suffer from heart failure may benefit from bi-ventricular pacing leads placed into the heart's coronary veins.