shoulder-hand syndrome

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shoulder-hand syndrome

 
a disorder of the upper limb characterized by pain and stiffness in the shoulder, with puffy swelling and pain in the ipsilateral hand; it sometimes occurs after myocardial infarction but can also be produced by other causes.

complex regional pain syndrome type I

diffuse persistent pain usually in an extremity often associated with vasomotor disturbances, trophic changes, and limitation or immobility of joints; frequently follows some local injury.

shoulder-hand syndrome

a neuromuscular condition characterized by pain and stiffness in the shoulder and arm, limited joint motion, swelling of the hand, muscle atrophy, and decalcification of the underlying bones. The condition occurs most commonly after myocardial infarction.
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Shoulder-hand syndrome

shoulder-hand syndrome

A condition characterised by shoulder pain, swelling, stiffness, vasomotor symptoms of arm and hand and skin oedema/induration, seen in patients above age 50 after an acute MI, or less commonly a cerebrovascular accident or head trauma. Shoulder-hand syndrome is attributed to reflex sympathetic stimulation; some patients later develop adhesive capsulitis, sclerodactyly and decreased range of motion with regional demineralisation.

shoulder-hand syndrome

Neurology A condition characterized by shoulder pain, swelling, stiffness, vasomotor Sx of arm and hand, skin edema/induration, in Pts > age 50 after an acute MI, or less commonly, a CVA or head trauma; SHS is attributed to reflex sympathetic stimulation; some Pts later develop adhesive capsulitis, sclerodactyly, and ↓ ROM with regional demineralization. See Rotator cuff.

shoulder-hand syndrome

A condition of unknown cause featuring pain, stiffness and disability in the shoulder and the hand on one side. There is wasting of the muscles and the hand may become hot, sweaty and swollen. Spontaneous recovery is usual but this may take up to two years.