coronary occlusion


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coronary

 [kor´ah-nar-e]
encircling in the manner of a crown; said of anatomical structures such as vessels, ligaments, or nerves.
coronary arteries two large arteries that branch from the ascending aorta and supply all of the heart muscle with blood (see also table of arteries).
 A view of the coronary arterial system. The arteries serving the posterior aspect of the myocardium are shown here in a lighter shade.
coronary artery disease (CAD) atherosclerosis of the coronary arteries, which may cause angina pectoris, myocardial infarction, and sudden death. Both genetically determined and avoidable risk factors contribute to the disease; they include hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, smoking, diabetes mellitus, and low levels of high density lipoproteins (HDL).
coronary heart disease (CHD) ischemic heart disease.
coronary occlusion the occlusion, or closing off, of a coronary artery, usually caused by a narrowing of the lumen of the blood vessels by the plaques of atherosclerosis. Sometimes a plaque may rupture and release vasoactive or thrombogenic substances that lead to clot formation. If there is adequate collateral circulation to the heart muscle at the time of the occlusion, there may be little or no damage to the myocardial cells. When occlusion is complete, however, with no blood being supplied to an area of the myocardium, myocardial infarction results.

occlusion

 [ŏ-kloo´zhun]
2. the trapping of a liquid or gas within cavities in a solid or on its surface.
3. the relation of the teeth of both jaws when in functional contact during activity of the mandible.
4. momentary complete closure of some area in the vocal tract, causing breathing to stop and pressure to accumulate.
Normal occlusion of the primary molars. From Darby and Walsh, 1994.
abnormal occlusion malocclusion.
central occlusion (centric occlusion) occlusion of the teeth when the mandible is in centric relation to the maxilla, with full occlusal surface contact of the upper and lower teeth in habitual occlusion.
coronary occlusion see coronary occlusion.
eccentric occlusion occlusion of the teeth when the lower jaw has moved from the centric position.
functional occlusion contact of the maxillary and mandibular teeth that provides the highest efficiency in the centric position and during all exclusive movements of the jaw that are essential to mastication without producing trauma.

cor·o·nar·y oc·clu·sion

blockage of a coronary vessel, usually by thrombosis or atheroma, often leading to myocardial infarction.

coronary occlusion

n.
The partial or complete obstruction of blood flow in a coronary artery, as by a thrombus or the progressive buildup of atherosclerotic plaque.

coronary occlusion

an obstruction of an artery that supplies the heart muscle. When complete, it causes myocardial infarction; when incomplete, it may cause angina. The underlying pathophysiological characteristic is atherosclerotic plaque, which usually develops slowly by buildup of lipid and macrophage complexes. Rapid plaque accumulation is frequently caused by hemorrhage within a plaque. If the plaque ruptures, platelets aggregate, fibrin is deposited, spasm occurs, and a thrombus develops, resulting in acute myocardial infarction. Treatment includes prompt IV thrombolysis and administration of heparin. Primary percutaneous transvenous coronary angioplasty can achieve prompt reperfusion. See also coronary artery disease.

cor·o·nar·y oc·clu·sion

(kōr'ŏ-nār-ē ŏ-klū'zhŭn)
Blockage of a coronary vessel, usually by thrombosis or atheroma, often leading to myocardial infarction.
Enlarge picture
CORONARY OCCLUSION

coronary occlusion

Complete or partial obstruction of a coronary vessel by thrombosis or as a result of spasm. Synonym: cardiac thrombosis; coronary thrombosis
See: myocardial infarction; illustration
See also: occlusion

coronary occlusion

Complete obstruction of blood flow in a CORONARY artery.

coronary occlusion

blockage of one or more coronary arteries, by atherosclerosis and/or thrombosis, leading to myocardial infarction (heart attack)

coronary occlusion,

n obstruction in the heart's blood-supplying arteries.

cor·o·nar·y oc·clu·sion

(kōr'ŏ-nār-ē ŏ-klū'zhŭn)
Blockage of a coronary vessel.

coronary

encircling in the manner of a crown.
1. a term applied to vessels, ligaments, nerves, the band at the skin-hoof junction.
2. blood vessels partially encircling the heart.

coronary arteries
two large arteries that branch from the ascending aorta and supply all of the heart muscle with blood. See also Table 9.
coronary artery anomaly
one or both arteries originate from the pulmonary artery instead of the aorta; anoxia of the myocardium leads to congestive heart failure.
coronary artery laceration
in foals during a difficult parturition and in cattle due to penetration by a reticular foreign body; sudden death due to cardiac tamponade.
coronary artery rupture
can result from perforation by a foreign body from the reticulum as part of the syndrome of traumatic reticular pericarditis. Cardiac tamponade results, causing acute or congestive heart failure.
coronary band
the junction of the skin and the horn of the hoof.
coronary chemoreflex
intravenous injection of chemicals such as veratridine causes cardiac slowing, hypotension and apnea due to reflex response by the myocardium. Called also Bezold-Jarisch reflex.
coronary cushion
the spongy, resilient hypodermis beneath the coronary corium of the hoof.
coronary emboli
lodgment of an embolus in a coronary artery is a rare occurrence in animals. Myocardial ischemia and asthenia result, the effect on the animal varying with the amount of muscle compromised.
coronary occlusion
the occlusion, or closing off, of a coronary artery. The occlusion may result from formation of a clot (thrombosis). Narrowing of the lumen of the blood vessels by the plaques of atherosclerosis, as occurs in humans, does not occur in animals. If there is adequate collateral circulation to the heart muscle at the time of the occlusion, there may be little or no damage to the myocardial cells. When occlusion is complete, however, with no blood being supplied to an area of the myocardium, myocardial infarction results.
coronary perfusion pressure
the difference between aortic diastolic and right atrial diastolic pressure; a determinant of the blood flow to cardiac muscle.
coronary thrombosis
formation of a clot in a coronary artery. See also myocardial infarction.

occlusion

1. the act of closure or state of being closed; an obstruction or a closing off.
2. the relation of the teeth of both jaws when in functional contact during activity of the mandible.

abnormal occlusion
malocclusion.
coronary occlusion
see coronary occlusion.
functional occlusion
contact of the maxillary and mandibular teeth that provides the highest efficiency in the centric position and during all exclusive movements of the jaw that are essential to mastication without producing trauma.
inflow occlusion
a technique used in cardiac surgery to produce complete circulatory arrest by temporarily interrupting venous return.
traumatic occlusion
any abnormality of occlusion which causes injury to structures within the mouth.
References in periodicals archive ?
Acute coronary occlusion in non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome: outcome and early identification by strain echocardiography.
It could be argued that the coronary occlusion and myocardial ischemia was responsible for the arrhythmias seen in our study.
ECG changes during spontaneous AMI may differ from ECG changes during PCI because controlled coronary occlusion was usually brief.
Angiographic suitability of catheter revascularization of total coronary occlusions in patients from a community hospital setting.
Most observations that have been made on corrosion casts suggest that the anastomotic vessels are relatively straight in normal hearts, but much coiled in hearts that have been subject to coronary occlusion.
In this study, we induced transient coronary occlusion of increasing duration in conscious dogs and serially measured their plasma concentrations of cytosolic and mitochondrial CK.
Daily treatments with WBPA for three days prior to the induced coronary occlusion reduced the death of heart muscle from 55% in the untreated animals to 16% in the treated animals.
Coronary occlusion in a previously magnesium-depleted heart will result in a larger area of necrosis and ischaemia (5).
Chronic total coronary occlusion is a relatively frequent lesion subset1,2 and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) in this setting is associated with lower success rates, increased costs, longer procedural duration and radiation exposure, greater use of contrast media, and higher restenosis rates compared with coronary stenosis3,4,5.
During the period of acute coronary occlusion viability preservation of cardiac tissue, prevention of the aneurysm formation and limitation of the infarction size may be all supplied by coronary collaterals.

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