coronary occlusion


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Related to coronary occlusion: hypocalcemia

coronary

 [kor´ah-nar-e]
encircling in the manner of a crown; said of anatomical structures such as vessels, ligaments, or nerves.
coronary arteries two large arteries that branch from the ascending aorta and supply all of the heart muscle with blood (see also table of arteries).
 A view of the coronary arterial system. The arteries serving the posterior aspect of the myocardium are shown here in a lighter shade.
coronary artery disease (CAD) atherosclerosis of the coronary arteries, which may cause angina pectoris, myocardial infarction, and sudden death. Both genetically determined and avoidable risk factors contribute to the disease; they include hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, smoking, diabetes mellitus, and low levels of high density lipoproteins (HDL).
coronary heart disease (CHD) ischemic heart disease.
coronary occlusion the occlusion, or closing off, of a coronary artery, usually caused by a narrowing of the lumen of the blood vessels by the plaques of atherosclerosis. Sometimes a plaque may rupture and release vasoactive or thrombogenic substances that lead to clot formation. If there is adequate collateral circulation to the heart muscle at the time of the occlusion, there may be little or no damage to the myocardial cells. When occlusion is complete, however, with no blood being supplied to an area of the myocardium, myocardial infarction results.

occlusion

 [ŏ-kloo´zhun]
2. the trapping of a liquid or gas within cavities in a solid or on its surface.
3. the relation of the teeth of both jaws when in functional contact during activity of the mandible.
4. momentary complete closure of some area in the vocal tract, causing breathing to stop and pressure to accumulate.
Normal occlusion of the primary molars. From Darby and Walsh, 1994.
abnormal occlusion malocclusion.
central occlusion (centric occlusion) occlusion of the teeth when the mandible is in centric relation to the maxilla, with full occlusal surface contact of the upper and lower teeth in habitual occlusion.
coronary occlusion see coronary occlusion.
eccentric occlusion occlusion of the teeth when the lower jaw has moved from the centric position.
functional occlusion contact of the maxillary and mandibular teeth that provides the highest efficiency in the centric position and during all exclusive movements of the jaw that are essential to mastication without producing trauma.

cor·o·nar·y oc·clu·sion

blockage of a coronary vessel, usually by thrombosis or atheroma, often leading to myocardial infarction.

coronary occlusion

n.
The partial or complete obstruction of blood flow in a coronary artery, as by a thrombus or the progressive buildup of atherosclerotic plaque.

cor·o·nar·y oc·clu·sion

(kōr'ŏ-nār-ē ŏ-klū'zhŭn)
Blockage of a coronary vessel, usually by thrombosis or atheroma, often leading to myocardial infarction.
Enlarge picture
CORONARY OCCLUSION

coronary occlusion

Complete or partial obstruction of a coronary vessel by thrombosis or as a result of spasm. Synonym: cardiac thrombosis; coronary thrombosis
See: myocardial infarction; illustration
See also: occlusion

coronary occlusion

Complete obstruction of blood flow in a CORONARY artery.

cor·o·nar·y oc·clu·sion

(kōr'ŏ-nār-ē ŏ-klū'zhŭn)
Blockage of a coronary vessel.
References in periodicals archive ?
Detection of acute coronary occlusion in patients with acute coronary syndromes presenting with isolated ST-segment depression.
This is in stark contrast to prior evidence demonstrating a lack of arrhythmogenesis and no effect on the electrocardiogram during coronary occlusion when DADLE is infused systemically and has the opportunity for global effects (5).
* RESULTS ST-segment elevation in the posterior leads was twice as frequent during occlusion of the circumflex artery as during right coronary occlusion (P < .001).
For example: In the 30-to-39 year-age bracket, of women who take the pill and smoke, the risk of developing a fatal coronary occlusion is ten times greater than the non-smokers.
Once again the importance of monitoring and identification of ECG patters was emphasized, particularly in the case of STEMI equivalents that are the hallmark of acute coronary occlusion [24].
Relation between myocardial perfusion and left ventricular function following acute coronary occlusion: Disproportionate effects of anterior vs.
(3) The possible mechanisms of coronary occlusion with thyrotoxicosis include: significant underlying coronary atherosclerosis, direct damage to coronary artery and coronary embolization.
We, therefore, used a rabbit model of 4 h of coronary occlusion followed by 2 h of reperfusion to observe the effects of single-dose atorvastatin on interleukin (IL)-6, interferon gamma (IFN-[gamma]), and myocardial no-reflow.

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