coronary event

coronary event

See Cardiac event.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
After an acute coronary event (chest pain signaling a pending heart attack) or full-blown heart attack, patients are given two antiplatelet medications to reduce the risk of a second heart attack.
Based on the results of the Odyssey Outcomes trial, Institute for Clinical and Economic Review has calculated two updated value-based price benchmarks, net of rebates and discounts, for Praluent in patients with a recent acute coronary event: $2,300-$3,400 per year if used to treat all patients who meet trial eligibility criteria, and $4,500-$8,000 per year if used to treat higher-risk patients with LDL cholesterol greater than or equal to 100 mg/dL despite intensive statin therapy.
A study published recently in the New England Journal of Medicine found that a healthy lifestyle could cut your risk of a heart attack in half if you have a high genetic risk for a coronary event. A high genetic risk, coupled with an unfavorable lifestyle, means your 10-year heart risk is about 11 percent.
We describe a case of anaphylaxis and angioedema with delayed coronary event findings suggestive of the possibility of a late inflammatory response resulting in myocardial injury.
Indians and Chinese suffer maximum financial catastrophe in Asia during acute coronary event.
"Indeed, given Reyes' fragile medical condition, her continued confinement at the Philippine Heart Center - a tertiary hospital equipped and capable of effectively evaluating and addressing her condition as well as properly managing any emergency situation - is the only way that Reyes would have the best possible chances of survival if and when an acute coronary event occurs," the motion read.
The results show that high particulate matter concentration at the residence location may increase the risk for an acute coronary event.
Subjects on aspirin therapy were divided into two groups; first-ever coronary event and recurrent coronary event.
A second 13,000-patient study, called SOLID-TIMI 52, is due to complete in March 2014 and is looking at patients who have already suffered an acute coronary event. It will assess if darapladib can prevent a secondary attack.
A team from John Hopkins University School of Medicine found that people with a cheery disposition are considerably less likely to suffer from a coronary event.