corn

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corn

 [korn]
1. Zea mays, a tall cereal plant that produces kernels on large ears and is the source of corn oil.
2. a circumscribed, conical, horny induration and thickening of the stratum corneum that causes severe pain by pressure on nerve endings in the corium. Corns are always caused by friction or pressure from poorly fitting shoes or hose. There are two kinds: the hard corn, usually located on the outside of the little toe or on the upper surfaces of the other toes; and the soft corn, found between the toes, usually the fourth and fifth toes, kept softened by moisture. Called also heloma.
corn oil a refined fixed oil obtained from the corn plant, Zea mays; used as a solvent and vehicle for medicinal agents and as a vehicle for injections. It has also been promoted as a source of polyunsaturated fatty acids in special diets.

corn

(kōrn),
1. The foodstuff, Zea mays
2. In dogs and cats, a hard keratin growth on the footpad.
3. In horses, a bruise resulting from impact on the sole of the foot and located between the wall and the bar at the heel.
4. A hard or soft hyperkeratosis of the sole of the human foot secondary to friction and pressure.
Synonym(s): clavus (1)
[L. cornu, horn, hoof]

corn

(korn) a horny induration and thickening of the stratum corneum of the epidermis, caused by friction and pressure and forming a conical mass pointing down into the dermis, producing pain and irritation.
hard corn  one usually located on the outside of the little toe or the upper surfaces of the other toes.
soft corn  one between the toes, kept softened by moisture, often leading to painful inflammation under the corn.

corn

(kôrn)
n.
A horny thickening of the skin, usually on or near a toe, resulting from pressure or friction. Also called clavus.

corn

Etymology: L, cornu, horn
a horny mass of condensed epithelial cells overlying a bony prominence. Corns result from chronic friction and pressure. The conic shape of the corn compresses the underlying dermis, making it thin and tender. Corns can become soft and macerated by perspiration. Treatment includes relief of the mechanical pressure and surgical paring or chemical peeling of the excess keratin. Also called clavus. Compare callus.
enlarge picture
Corn

corn

Podiatry A small, hard, conical hyperkeratosis caused by friction and pressure; the corn's apex may rub against subcutaneous nerve fibers causing significant pain Types Hard, soft Management Paring with a scalpel blade, appropriate footwear, padding–eg, hammer toe splint or corn pads. See Hard corn, Soft corn.

corn

(kōrn)
1. The foodstuff, Zea mays.
2. A hard or soft hyperkeratosis of the sole of the foot due to friction and pressure.
[L. cornu, horn, hoof]

corn

A protective response to local skin pressure in the form of an increased production of flattened, horny cells (cornified epithelium). The local pressure forces these hard cells further into the skin and stimulates further production.
Fig. 120 Corn. Generalized structure.click for a larger image
Fig. 120 Corn . Generalized structure.

corn

any of various cereal plants. The term ‘corn’ usually denotes the predominant cereal crop of a region, e.g. wheat in England, oats in Scotland and Ireland, and maize in North and South America.

corn

1. a circumscribed hyperkeratosis of the footpad of dogs, sensitive to pressure.
2. a hematoma between the sensitive laminae and horn of the sole, usually between the frog and bar, in the hoof of the horse. It is painful on pressure and a cause of lameness.
3. in USA and elsewhere Zea mays, a member of the plant family Poaceae, grown as a cereal crop bearing seeds and used as a grain feed, green chop and ensilage. Used also for human consumption as meal or flour. The grain is deficient in most essential amino acids, especially lysine and tryptophan (high-lysine varieties are available), and in calcium and cannot be used as a complete ration in pigs. It may be fed whole, cracked, flaked, roasted, as dried or as high moisture corn (contains 25% moisture). Overeating of the grain by ruminants causes carbohydrate engorgement, and of moldy standing corn causes moldy corn poisoning. Called also maize.
4. in UK triticum aestivum is also called corn.
5. the name corn is also used with other cereals such as rye corn, barley corn.

corn cob
see cob (2). Ground into a meal it is used as a roughage of very low nutritive value in ruminant diets. Of some value as a diluent in high grain diets.
corn cockle
agrostemmagithago.
corn oil
rich source of unsaturated fatty acids, particularly linoleic acid.
wild corn
see veratrumcalifornicum.

Patient discussion about corn

Q. What corn based products can I eat. I have diverticular disease. I love corn tortillas, corn bread, corn dogs.

A. The dietary recommendations for people with diverticular disease of the colon are usually to add fibers-rich foods (fruits, vegetables etc.). As far as I know corn isn't especially rich in dietary fibers, so I don't know about any recommended corn-based foods, although I don't know about any recommendations to refrain from eating corn-based foods.

If you have any questions regarding this subject, you may consult your doctor. You may also read more here:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/dietaryfiber.html

More discussions about corn
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