corneal

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Related to corneal transparency: corneal reflex, Corneal stroma

corneal

 [kor´ne-al]
pertaining to the cornea.
corneal reflex a reflex action of the eye resulting in automatic closing of the eyelid when the cornea is stimulated. The corneal reflex can be elicited in a normal person by gently touching the cornea with a wisp of cotton. Absence of the corneal reflex indicates deep coma or injury of one of the nerves carrying the reflex arc.
corneal transplantation transplantation of a donor cornea into the eye of a recipient, done to improve the vision of patients with distorted curvature of the cornea (keratoconus) or corneal edema, infection, trauma, or intractable pain. Vision should improve beginning the day after surgery with optimal vision 6 to 12 months later. Because the cornea does not have a blood supply, corneal transplants were one of the earliest successful types of organ transplants. Called also keratoplasty.

cor·ne·al

(kōr'nē-ăl),
Relating to the cornea.

cor·ne·al

(kōr'nē-ăl)
Relating to the cornea.

corneal 

Pertaining to the cornea.

corneal

pertaining to the cornea. See also keratitis, keratopathy.

corneal anomaly
includes microcornea, coloboma, megalocornea, dermoid, congenital opacity.
corneal black body
see corneal sequestrum (below).
corneal coloboma
an uncommon congenital defect in the continuity of the cornea; may have concurrent herniation of the uveal tract. See also coloboma.
corneal dystrophy
a developmental condition, inherited in some breeds of dogs and cats. May cause corneal edema and ulceration. See also keratopathy.
corneal ectasia
corneal edema
occurs when fluid accumulates in the corneal stroma, disrupting the normal lamellar structure and causing a loss of transparency. Commonly called blue eye.
corneal erosion syndrome
see refractory ulcer.
feline focal corneal necrosis
see corneal sequestrum (below).
corneal hyaline membrane
an abnormal, semitransparent membrane on the posterior surface of the cornea, attached to the endothelium. Can be associated with persistent pupillary membrane. Caused by inflammation or a developmental defect.
corneal inflammation
inherited corneal opacity
congenital opacity of the cornea occurs in cattle. The animals are not completely blind and the rest of the eye is normal. Both eyes are affected. The lesion is an edema of the corneal lamellae.
corneal laminae
the limiting membranes that separate the bulk of the cornea from the covering epithelia; the anterior is Bowman's, the posterior is descemet's membrane.
corneal lipidosis
cholesterol crystals and lipid vacuoles may be found in the corneal stroma as a result of persistent hypercholesterolemia or chronic stromal inflammation.
melting corneal
see collagenase ulcer.
corneal mummification
see corneal sequestrum (below).
corneal opacity
corneal pigmentation
results from chronic irritation. The melanin is in the superficial stroma and the basal layer of the corneal epithelium. See also superficial pigmentary keratitis.
corneal reflex
a reflex action of the eye resulting in automatic closing of the eyelids when the cornea is stimulated. The corneal reflex can be elicited in a normal animal by gently touching the cornea with a wisp of cotton. Absence of the corneal reflex indicates deep coma or injury of one of the nerves carrying the reflex arc.
corneal ring abscess
an infected corneal ulcer in which there is a surrounding zone of liquefaction encircled by a zone of neutrophils.
corneal scar
corneal opacity.
corneal sequestrum
a central, focal, dark necrotic plaque on the cornea of cats, especially Persians, associated with chronic ulcerative or inflammatory disease of the cornea. Called also focal superficial necrosis, corneal mummification, keratitis nigrum.
corneal shield
protection used in the treatment of corneal ulcers or wounds; commercial products consisting of collagen which is dissolved in the tear film are claimed to enhance healing.
corneal stromal depositions
minerals, lipids or pigment deposited in the stroma following injury.
superficial corneal erosion
see refractory ulcer.
corneal tattooing
done mainly in horses to obscure unsightly scarring of the cornea.
corneal transparency
the quality of being able to see objects through the cornea; partly the result of the strict horizontal lamellal distribution of its collagen fibers, parallel to the corneal surface.
corneal transplantation
corneal ulcer
a defect in the corneal epithelium and some amount of stroma; may be caused by trauma, chronic irritation as from distichiasis, entropion or keratitis sicca, or infectious agents. Deep ulcers can lead to rupture of the cornea, the escape of aqueous humor and often prolapse of the iris with a secondary uveitis and endophthalmitis. See also ulcer.
Enlarge picture
Corneal ulcer in a horse. By permission from Knottenbelt DC, Pascoe RR, Diseases and Disorders of the Horse, Saunders, 2003
corneal vascularization
results from inflammation of the cornea, the vessels growing in from the limbus. It is a necessary repair process but it reduces visual acuity.
References in periodicals archive ?
2] During corneal wound healing, CSCs are activated and transformed into fibroblasts, myofibroblasts, or both, losing their dendritic morphology [1] and resulting in a reduction in ALDH levels [15] and corneal transparency.
Furthermore, the researchers showed that HGF is solely responsible for the restoration of corneal transparency.
The balance between corneal transparency and edema: the Proctor Lecture.
Corneal transparency is thought to rely in part on the small diameter of these collagen fibrils and the pattern of spaces between them, which reduce the potential for light scatter.
We found that transplanting cultivated CECs in combination with a low-molecular weight compound that inhibits ROCK (ROCK inhibitor Y-27632), successfully achieved the recovery of corneal transparency," Koizumi stated.
during a study found that the applying other growth factors derived from platelets on the corneal epithelium, increase their development and trophism, these findings are consistent with our results that showed rapid wound healing and fast return of corneal transparency [11,16,17].
Exposure keratitis was assessed clinically by observation for the reduction in corneal transparency at the exposed parts of the cornea both pre- and post-operatively.
It can leave scars, a feeling of darkness and result in loss of corneal transparency.
10) In that time the importance of the corneal endothelium integrity in maintaining the corneal transparency, currently a well known principle, had not been discovered.
Both Lumican and Keratocan play a role in the development and maintenance of corneal transparency making them ideal for applications in Eye and Cornea Research.
Favorable corneal transparency was obtained in all cases unless postoperative complications occurred during follow-up period [Figure 1] and [Table 3].
of corneal transparency was constant post-operative complication in Gr-I and similar observations were also recorded by Tyagi et al.