cork

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cork

(kork),
1. The outer bark of the cork oak, used to make stoppers for some better bottles of wine. 2. A stopper made of cork or any similar substance.
[L. quercus, oak]

cork

a plant tissue made up of cells with thick walls impregnated with SUBERIN. Cork cells are dead when mature, forming an outer layer in stems and roots of woody plants that is impervious to water and air. The cork oak Quercus suber produces very large quantities of cork which can be removed and used commercially
References in periodicals archive ?
Simpson and Veitch (1993) estimated the cost of sensory appraisal of 1,000,000 corks to be $1,600 to $3,200 (or 2-3 cents per case).
The black stork, black vulture, and endangered Spanish imperial eagle, of which only 130 pairs remain worldwide, are among the 42 species of birds that depend on the cork woodlands.
A good part of the book's fascination is simply why a man would go from being one of President Clinton's speechwriters to an unemployed college graduate building a boat out of champagne corks in a borrowed garage.
While 82 per cent of winemakers who took part in a 2003 survey carried out by Wine Business Monthly said they still used natural cork, 28 per cent were using some form of synthetic closure for at least some of their wines.
Alternatives such as synthetic corks and wines with screw-caps have been offered as solutions.
In some batches 20 to 50pc of the corks will also give a dulling effect to the wine.
Simon Thorpe, Waitrose "Customers are driving this because they don't like synthetic corks.
Simply put, this is wine that has gone off because of a faulty cork.
Corks are bleached with hypochlorite, but still, there is a lot of storage and shipping involved giving microbes the opportunity to take up residence in the cork.
Portugal is at the centre of a row threatening to break up a timeless marriage between wine and the one product in which the country leads the world - cork.
The bark of the cork oak appears to have been designed to make corks for bottles.
The Nomacorc division commercialized its coextruded, foam-core polyethylene corks last year.