cork

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cork

(kork),
1. The outer bark of the cork oak, used to make stoppers for some better bottles of wine. 2. A stopper made of cork or any similar substance.
[L. quercus, oak]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

cork

a plant tissue made up of cells with thick walls impregnated with SUBERIN. Cork cells are dead when mature, forming an outer layer in stems and roots of woody plants that is impervious to water and air. The cork oak Quercus suber produces very large quantities of cork which can be removed and used commercially
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Tandit that among the land units that have been modified, it is degraded surfaces that have experienced an increase of 9.2% is 98, 43 ha justified by reforestation and the phenomenon enresinement in reality the geographical area of cork oak, grows of natural and introduced coniferous species such as Aleppo pine, which have resulted in long-term occupation of the ecological niche of cork oak.
Cuvaison Estate Wines in California's Napa Valley is lending its support to the replanting of cork oak forests in threatened habitats in Portugal.
The wine industry plays a critical role in maintaining the economic value of cork and the cork oak forests.
More than half the world's cork oak woodlands are found in Spain and Portugal, which produce three-quarters of the world's cork.
Farming engineer Antonio Campos emphasises the importance of "restoring indigenous species, notably broad-leaved trees such as green oak and cork oak in the south, and oak and chestnut in the north, instead of systematically planting pine and eucalyptus".
Current trends include replacement of evergreen oak forest, cork oak (Quercus suber), by fast-growing trees such as Eucalyptus species, and an increase in agriculture and grazing pressure, as a result of demographic pressure (northern Africa) or deleterious land management practices (Europe).
Cork is harvested from the bark of the cork oak tree every nine to eleven years, allowing the tree to live its full life expectancy of 150 to 250 years.
The area will be replanted with cork oak and umbrella pines to replace non-indigenous eucalyptus and pines.
The country is the source of more than hall the world's supply of cork, which comes from the bark of the cork oak tree.
Cork, harvested from the bark of a cork oak tree without harming the tree, is also popular because it can be installed quickly without glue.
The environmentally friendly product is harvested from the bark of cork oak trees that grow primarily in Spain and Portugal.
Diners can help by donating corks to the appeal so they can be turned into a huge sculpture to draw the nation's attention to the value of the cork oak woods for people and wildlife.