core decompression

core decompression

Orthopedic surgery A procedure for nontraumatic osteonecrosis, in which the BM is decompressed by removing a core of medullary bone, which is then reinserted to support the weakened cortical bone. See Osteoporosis.
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sup][7] Core decompression is now the most frequently used procedure and offers effective results,[sup][2] indications for core decompression are strictly limited to the early stages of AVNFH before femoral head collapse,[sup][8] it is a minimally invasive surgery can achieve the same effect as open surgery, and the technique has gradually diversified into single large-diameter drilling and multiple small-diameter drilling with or without bone grafting (either vascularized or nonvascularized).
Patients who required additional procedures, such as osteotomy, bone grafting, repeat core decompression, or total hip arthroplasty (THA), were also considered clinical failures.
Conclusion: Generally, stage I and II, prior to subchondral collapse, can be approached with both pharmacological and biophysical treatment modalities before more invasive measures, such as core decompression, are considered.
Reports on core decompression, osteotomies, electrical stimulation, and cancellous or cortical bone grafting have all failed to give consistent and significant disease modification or preventing progression11,13,17.
The treatment modalities have evolved over the period of few decades ranging from core decompression to the present Total hip replacement.
NASDAQ: WMGI), a global orthopaedic medical device company, today announced the commercial release of its innovative new biologic grafting system for use in core decompression surgical procedures.
Compared with the nonoperative management group, the core decompression (CD) group had a notable effect on the natural history and clinical progression in the early stages of ONFH.
Core decompression has been used as a treatment for early osteonecrosis of the hip and has been hypothesized to improve symptoms in patients with bone marrow edema syndrome by decreasing elevated intramedullary pressure.
Similar to studies for the femoral head, core decompression has been proposed to decrease intraosseous pressure during the early stages of osteonecrosis.
Core decompression may used in the management of early stage, precollapse nontraumatic osteonecrosis of the humeral head.
26) Papadopoulos and colleagues (25) reported a good result in a 45-year-old male who underwent extra-articular core decompression after failing 8 weeks of nonoperative treatment for BMES.