core biopsy


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core biopsy

A large-bore biopsy, most commonly a breast biopsy from a woman with a lesion, which has been deemed suspicious by mammography and subsequently submitted for pathological evaluation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lung core biopsy showing complex papillary fragments demonstrating true fibrovascular cores predominantly (H & E stain X 200)
Percutaneous core biopsy of small renal mass lesions : a diagnostic tool to better stratify patients for surgical intervention.
(4) Following a BIRADS 4 assessment, the target lesion was localized by stereotactic or ultrasound guidance and an 8- or 11-gauge vacuum-assisted core biopsy was performed.
Dawwas et al., "Comparison of the diagnostic performance of 2 core biopsy needles for EUS-guided tissue acquisition from solid pancreatic lesions," Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, vol.
Our case demonstrates successful use of percutaneous core biopsy sampling providing final diagnosis of traumatic neuroma.
The diagnosis was most frequently made with a clinically guided core biopsy. It is interesting to note the high failure rate of this, and as many as 8 of the 23 patients required surgical excision for diagnosis.
This volume describes the diagnosis of breast pathology by needle core biopsy. It covers embryology, development, histology, and physiologic morphology; specific types of tumors and their clinical presentation, microscopic pathology, immunohistochemistry, radiologic features, differential diagnosis, and prognosis and treatment; the pathologic effects of therapy; breast pathology in men and children; pathologic changes and clinical complications associated with needling; and processing, pathological examination, and reporting of specimens.
(b) Small core biopsy fragments show invasive carcinoma with clusters and cords of cells that show squamous morphology.
Because there was a high index of suspicion for a malignant process, a second CT-guided core biopsy was performed one week later; histopathological findings were reminiscent of the first biopsy and showed no evidence of malignancy.
Harmsen et al., "Safety and accuracy of percutaneous image-guided core biopsy of the spleen," American Journal of Roentgenology, vol.
Although core biopsy is preferred to FNAC in most developed countries, its procedure is more expensive and time consuming as compared to FNAC(8-10).
The former is further segmented into fine-needle aspiration, core-needle, and vacuum-assisted core biopsy.