core


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core

(kōr),
1. The central mass of necrotic tissue in a boil.
2. A metal casting or resin form, usually with a post in the canal of a tooth root, designed to retain an artificial crown.
3. A sectional record, usually of plaster of Paris or one of its derivatives, of the relationships of parts, such as teeth, metallic restorations, or copings.
4. The central part of a structure, for example, the core of a glycogen particle or teh core of a virus.
[L. cor, heart]

core

(kôr)
n.
Anatomy The muscles in the trunk of the human body, including those of the abdomen and chest, that stabilize the spine, pelvis, and shoulders.

CORE

Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation. A testing system for managers and practitioners working in counseling and psychological therapy services in the UK, which provides a framework for responding to the increasing demand in health and other sectors to provide evidence of service quality and effectiveness.

core

(kōr)
Made up of the rectus abdominis, transversus abdominis, internal and external oblique muscles. The muscles are used to stabilize the upper torso during movement.
[L. cor, heart]

core

(kōr)
1. Metal casting or resin form, usually with a post in the canal of a tooth root, designed to retain an artificial crown.
2. Sectional record, usually of plaster of Paris or one of its derivatives, of the relationships of parts, such as teeth, metallic restorations, or copings.
[L. cor, heart]
References in periodicals archive ?
By developing a 10-core Comet Lake-S chip, the company should be able to deliver performance improvements in each tier of its gaming processor product stack: Core i5, Core i7, Core i9.
Fans are unlikely to be happy about the removal of hyperthreading from the Core i7, leaving the feature available only in the most expensive desktop chip in the market.
As CPU core counts scale up it becomes harder and harder to find workloads that can take advantage of all cores.
Need different diameter cores and/or different core lengths?
Overall, NIEHS expects that an EHS Core Center will: 1) provide intellectual leadership and innovation in environmental health sciences, environmental medicine, and public health; 2) stimulate integration of basic, applied, and clinical research in order to better understand the impact of environmental exposures on human disease; 3) facilitate and develop new multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary research strategies to advance the field; 4) incorporate novel technologies and methods into EHS research; 5) serve as a source of information and expertise to the surrounding communities and stakeholders in order to further scientific collaborations and dissemination of research results; 6) provide career development for future research leaders.
As pilot Core Discovery courses began, instructors requested library tours.
Toshiba will continue to develop MeP technology and to apply high-end gigaherz-level MeP cores to SoC for digital products.
Gravitational instability isn't likely to produce a dense core, comments Didier Saumon of the Los Alamos (N.M.) National Laboratory.
MANAGING PHYSICIAN PERFORMANCE -- June 24-Aug 4, InterAct (24 core hrs $1250/$1400 non)
is to break the tight adhesion of the cooling and shrinking part to the mold core. The second goal is to allow the part to shrink radially away from the cavity wall.
In addition, there are customer adjacencies (Schwab's pursuit of higher-wealth customers); value-chain moves (Nike's decision to open its own retail stores); and new businesses based on core competencies (American Airlines' creation of Sabre).