powder

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powder

 [pow´der]
an aggregation of particles, as that obtained by grinding or rubbing a solid.

pow·der

(pow'dĕr),
1. A dry mass of minute separate particles of any substance.
2. In pharmaceutics, a homogeneous dispersion of finely divided, relatively dry, particulate matter consisting of one or more substances; the degree of fineness of a pow'der is related to passage of the material through standard sieves.
3. A single dose of a powdered drug, enclosed in an envelope of folded paper.
4. To reduce a solid substance to a state of fine division.
[Fr. poudre; L. pulvis]

powder

(pou′dər)
n.
1. A substance consisting of ground, pulverized, or otherwise finely dispersed solid particles.
2. Any of various preparations in the form of powder, as certain cosmetics and medicines.

pow′der·er n.

powder

Chinese medicine
A general term for ground herbs and formulas used in Chinese herbal medicine to prepare in capsules, infusions, liquors, porridges, ointments, pastes and pills; powders are less concentrated than decoctions, gentler, are best suited for chronic conditions.

powder

Drug slang A pulverized abuse substance–eg, heroin, amphetamine, cocaine Vox populi A pulverized material. See Antler velvet powder, Dover's powder, Fluticasone propionate inhalation powder, Inheritance powder, James Fever powder, Talcum powder.

pow·der

(pow'dĕr)
1. A dry mass of minute separate particles of any substance.
2. pharmaceutics A homogeneous dispersion of finely divided, relatively dry particulate matter consisting of one or more substances.
3. A single dose of a powdered drug, enclosed in an envelope of folded paper.
4. To reduce a solid substance to a state of very fine division.
[Fr. poudre; L. pulvis]

pow·der

(pow'dĕr)
1. A dry mass of minute separate particles of any substance.
2. In pharmaceutics, a homogeneous dispersion of finely divided, relatively dry, particulate matter consisting of one or more substances.
[Fr. poudre; L. pulvis]
References in periodicals archive ?
They would load about 400 pounds of cordite to propel a shell 20 miles."
303 Mark VI--adopted in 1904, its 215-grain FMJ bullet was backed by a 32.5-grain charge of Cordite for a muzzle velocity of 2050 fps.
Mark I cordite was the first version and used extensively.
The use of cordite (and other such smokeless explosives) freed the battlefield from its cloud.
* .303 Mark I Cordite--was the first .303 cartridge issued to Muslim troops consisted of a rimmed, bottlenecked case 56mm long loaded with 30 grains of Cordite, which propelled its 215-grain round-nosed, full metal jacketed (FMJ) bullet to a velocity of 1970 fps.
Long bullets, such as WW II incendiary, are too long and take up too much space in the case for cordite to be used effectively and another, more dense, higher energy powder must be used.
In another remark made in the course of his Cordite interview Kinsella declares, "Language is a thing in itself.
Cordite's mark has slipped to 97 from a peak of 104 but his best form would give him a chance.
Frosting is a term used when a bore has a great deal of very light pits usually due to firing corrosive primers in older ammunition and also the great heat generated from many shots with cordite -sometimes known as cordite burn.
Mick Appleby saddles Cordite, who was beaten three-quarters of a length into third behind Loving Spirit last time.