cordiform


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

cordiform

 [kor´dĭ-form]
heart-shaped.

cor·di·form

(kōr'di-fōrm),
Heart-shaped.
[L. cor (cord-), heart, + forma, shape]

cor·di·form

(kōr'di-fōrm)
Heart-shaped.
[L. cor (cord-), heart, + forma, shape]
References in periodicals archive ?
The addition of 1 g [l.sup.-1] hydrolyzed casein promoted an average formation of 61.8 new globular and 0.5 cordiform embryos per callus at the end of every subculture (P = 0.0433) (Table 2).
However, in the present conditions of maturation, the percentage of embryos developing to cordiform and torpedo ontogenetic stages was low and no embryo at cotyledonary phase was seen, revealing an asynchronous development, once globular somatic embryos were formed (Table 3).
At this point it is worth remembering that the cordiform maps were invented and published before the heart's function was well seen, described or understood.
Werner did so in his 1514 treatise, while Fine used the legends of his maps to make word-plays with the Latin stem cor ("and so we cordially present to you, dear reader ..."), or to declare his double cordiform map "twin figures of the human heart".
lanceolate-oblong) blade with truncate to cordiform (vs.
0.5-1.0 mm, ovate, brown, opaque, dispersed, marginally entire; blades 12-21 x 4-7 cm, lanceolate, chartaceous to spongiosus, basically truncate equilateral to inequilateral, apically acute to acuminate; costal scales 1-2 x 0.51 mm, ovate, brown, dispersed, marginally entire to erose; blade scales 0.5-1 x 0.2-0.4 mm, ovate, light brown, dispersed, basically erose to ciliate; veins few evident, simple to 1-forked, 1-2 mm apart, diverging at 60-70[degrees] from costa; hydathodes very evident, black; fertile fronds 25-36 cm long; stipes 2/3-3/4 the frond length; fertile blades 9-12 x 2.3-2.7 cm, lanceolate to lanceolate-oblong, basically truncate to cordiform, apically acute; interporangial scales ca.
(1) Fine's earlier double cordiform world map of 1531 does not show Magellan's South Pacific islands.
FINE, OrONCE, (1531), Nova, et integra universi orbis descriptio [map], Reproduction of Oronce Fine's double cordiform world map of 1531.
1511 Sylvanus, Bernard cordiform world map in 2 colours.
His lost terrestrial globe made prior to 1526 is said to have influenced Oronce Fine's double cordiform (heart-shaped) world map of 1531.
(32) For example, see Oronce Fine's double cordiform map of 1531, a version of which is in the British Library, London.
The work develops from intuitions about Australia from its personification as Magellanica on the title-page of Ortelius's Theatrum orbis terrarum (1570), a peninsula ("Regio Patalis") jutting north from Antarctica named as "Terra Australis" on the right panel of Oronce Fine's double cordiform world-map of 1531 (tipped into Gryneaus's Novus orbis), and accounts from both Antonio Pigafetta and earlier Portuguese explorers known to have passed by the land that James Cook officially discovered in his voyage of 1772-1775.