coralloid

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coralloid

(kôr′ə-loid′, kŏr′-) also

coralloidal

(-loid′l)
adj.
Resembling coral in appearance or form.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
punticulatus were associated with coralline, crystalline, and relatively unperturbed environments.
New Zealand has a particularly rich diversity of coralline algae and they can extensively cover hard substratum (Figure 2).
Laboratory observations and gut content analyses of hatchery-reared juveniles show that postmetamorphic juveniles graze on minute benthic diatoms, microalgae, and bacteria associated with encrusting coralline algae and rock surfaces (Olsen 1984, Norman-Boudreau et al.
This unique pink formation, crustose coralline algae, helps cement coral reefs together and is hard enough to walk on (though visitors should avoid stepping on the fragile coral itself).
Heidi Burdett, Heriot-Watt University research fellow, said: "We found that there was a rapid, communitylevel shift to net dissolution, meaning that within that community, the skeletons of calcifying organisms like starfish and coralline algae were dissolving.
We have previously reported a coralline hydroxyapatite/ calcium carbonate (CHACC) material which shows promising clinical performance when implanted in sizes ranging from 10-100 x 10 x 10 [mm.sup.3] [9, 10].
Recent research has shown that brooding corals respond to a general biofilm, while spawning species have a specific affinity for a few species of crustose coralline algae (Ritson-Williams et al., 2016b).
Shocking as Coralline's acts are, Lilly's story is never entirely bleak.
Manzanillo Point, coralline rock, 9[grados]38'17.43" N-82[grados]38'58.21" W, Aug.
It's known as crustose coralline algae, or CCA, and it's particularly sensitive to acidification, which is a major consequence of increased carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere: the acidity of marine waters increases as our oceans absorb more and more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.