coracoid

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coracoid

 [kor´ah-koid]
like a crow's beak. 2. the coracoid process, a projection from the upper part of the neck of the scapula, overhanging the shoulder joint.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

cor·a·coid

(kōr'ă-koyd),
Shaped like a crow's beak; denoting a process of the scapula.
[G. korakōdēs, like a crow's beak, fr. korax, raven, + eidos, appearance]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

coracoid

(kôr′ə-koid′, kŏr′-)
n.
1. A bony process projecting from the scapula toward the sternum in mammals.
2. A beak-shaped bone articulating with the scapula and sternum in many other vertebrates, such as birds and reptiles.
adj.
Of, relating to, or resembling a coracoid.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

cor·a·coid

(kōr'ă-koyd)
Shaped like a crow's beak; denoting a process of the scapula.
[G. korakōdēs, like a crow's beak, fr. korax, raven, + eidos, appearance]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

coracoid

A bony process on the outer side of the shoulder-blade (scapula) which projects forward under the outer end of the collar-bone (clavicle).
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

coracoid

one of a pair of bones that form the ventral part of the pectoral girdle of many vertebrates. In most mammals they are reduced to small processes on the SCAPULA and their role taken over by the CLAVICLES.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The coracoid tip-glenoid distance was measured linearly in the ML direction between the most lateral point of the coracoid to the center of the glenoid.
Material: SDNHM 50700, partial skull; 45102, left distal coracoid; 50679 phalange.
On the other hand rigid internal fixation between clavicle and acromion will fail, as it interferes with the routine rotational movement of the clavicle with respect to coracoid and acromion.
A complete right tibiotarsus, a right coracoid and a fragmentary furcula in the LACM collection were identified as this species by Loye Miller.
Loukas showed axillary arch originated from the latissimus dorsi with extensive branching, inserting into three of the more common sites; the pectoralis major, pectoralis minor and coracoid process.
Regan, 1911; Chardon, 1968; Roberts, 1973; Lundberg, 1975; Howes, 1983ab; Fink & Fink, 1981, 1996; Arratia, 1987; Schaefer, 1990; Mo, 1991; Arratia, 1992; De Pinna, 1993, 1998; Diogo, 2004) but others seemingly constitute additional potential synapomorphies to diagnose the order, such as: arrector dorsalis not subdivided into different sections (22: 1 [right arrow] 0); frontal and autopterotic not contacting in dorsal view (48: 0 [right arrow] 1); absence of 'ligament between posttemporal and posterior margin of neurocranium' (92: 0 [right arrow] 1); presence of coracoid bridge (103: 0 [right arrow] 1); adductor mandibulae attaching exclusively on mandible and/or primordial ligament, near its mandibular insertion (111: 1 [right arrow] 0).
They can manifest as a cluster of accessory fascicles arising from coracoids process, pectoralis minor tendon, proximal head of humerus or articular capsule of humerus [2].
Metastatic breast carcinoma of the coracoid process: two case reports.
Abstract: Medical records of wild bird admissions to the Australian Wildlife Health Centre at Healesville Sanctuary were analyzed for cases of unilateral coracoid fractures with known final outcomes.
Bones of the thoracic girdle: The thoracic girdle is composed of the clavicle, coracoid, and scapula.