coracoid


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coracoid

 [kor´ah-koid]
like a crow's beak. 2. the coracoid process, a projection from the upper part of the neck of the scapula, overhanging the shoulder joint.

cor·a·coid

(kōr'ă-koyd),
Shaped like a crow's beak; denoting a process of the scapula.
[G. korakōdēs, like a crow's beak, fr. korax, raven, + eidos, appearance]

coracoid

(kôr′ə-koid′, kŏr′-)
n.
1. A bony process projecting from the scapula toward the sternum in mammals.
2. A beak-shaped bone articulating with the scapula and sternum in many other vertebrates, such as birds and reptiles.
adj.
Of, relating to, or resembling a coracoid.

cor·a·coid

(kōr'ă-koyd)
Shaped like a crow's beak; denoting a process of the scapula.
[G. korakōdēs, like a crow's beak, fr. korax, raven, + eidos, appearance]

coracoid

A bony process on the outer side of the shoulder-blade (scapula) which projects forward under the outer end of the collar-bone (clavicle).

coracoid

one of a pair of bones that form the ventral part of the pectoral girdle of many vertebrates. In most mammals they are reduced to small processes on the SCAPULA and their role taken over by the CLAVICLES.
References in periodicals archive ?
The variables analyzed were the width of the cardiac silhouette, sternum, thoracic cavity, coracoid, and hepatic silhouette and the ratios between the cardiac silhouette and each of the other 4 anatomic structures measured.
Coracoid graft osteolysis after the Latarjet procedure for anteroinferior shoulder instability: a computed tomography scan study of twenty-six patients.
SICK scapula is an acronym that stands for Scapular malposition, Inferior medial border prominence, Coracoid pain and malposition, and dysKinesis of scapular movement.
In SOV MR images, SSB typically appeared as a saddlebag-shaped hyperintense area between the inferior surface of the coracoid process and the superior margin of the SSC [Figure 1]d.
A fat-fluid level was present in the subacromial bursa and the CT scan demonstrated a splayed fracture of the base of the coracoid process measuring 7.4 mm with 21[degrees]of angulation (Figure 1B).
Guide wires were positioned through the preexisting drill holes in the clavicle and coracoid. All holes were drilled again by using the TightRope 4 mm drill.
The horizontal distance between the coracoid process and the biceps tendon groove was found to be 44.0 mm (95% CI, 41.5 to 46.5) and 62.2 mm (95% CI, 59.2 to 65.2) in 0[degrees] and 45[degrees] of shoulder external rotation, respectively.
All diagnostic characters of Pliosauridae not shared by Stenorhynchosaurus are postcranial, with the pre-glenoid extension of the coracoid relatively wide in Stenorhynchosaurus, but narrow in Pliosauridae [150.1], the preaxial margin of the humerus straight in Stenorhynchosaurus rather than concave in dorsal or ventral view in pliosaurids [157.1], and the convex pre-axial surface of the tibia in Pliosauridae [178.1] not present in Stenorhynchosaurus (Ketchum & Benson, 2010; this work).
Assessment of ROM Shoulder ROM Patient Fulcrum Position Flexion Supine Greater tuberosity Abduction Supine Coracoid process Adduction Supine Coracoid process External rotation Supine Olecranon process Internal rotation Supine Olecranon process Extension Prone Greater tuberosity Shoulder ROM Starting Position of the Limb Flexion Arm by the side of the body Abduction Arm by the side of the body Adduction Arm by the side of the body External rotation Shoulder in 90[degrees] abduction and elbow in 90[degrees] flexion Internal rotation Shoulder in 90[degrees] abduction and elbow in 90[degrees] flexion Extension Arm by the side of the body Table 2.
The dorsal one, the suprascapula (SS), is posteriorly bowed (Figure 2) and not connected or fused to the synarcual or the vertebral column (Figure 1); the ventral one, the coracoid bar (CB) is anteriorly bowed.
Misdiagnosis of the injury can occur in more than 50% of patients, most commonly due to an inappropriate physical examination such as prominence of the coracoid, posterior prominence of the humeral and decreased external rotation of the shoulder,1,2 and/or an inadequate radiographic examination.
Among the fossils identified were several fragmentary cranial bones: frontal, parietal, right postorbital, left squamosal, right prefrontal, left quadrate, left jugal, left quadratojugal, left lacrimal and several undetermined fragments; left mandible and a fragment of the right, and one isolated tooth; and postcranial bones: 2 paravertebral osteoderms from the nuchal region, 16 paravertebral osteoderms from the trunk region, 22 ventral osteoderms and 16 appendicular osteoderms; 3 cervical and 7 dorsal vertebrae; 2 cervical and 6 thoracic ribs; left coracoid, left and right ulnae, left and right radii, left and fragmentary right ulnare, left radiale, 4 metacarpals and 1 phalanx.