coracoid


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coracoid

 [kor´ah-koid]
like a crow's beak. 2. the coracoid process, a projection from the upper part of the neck of the scapula, overhanging the shoulder joint.

cor·a·coid

(kōr'ă-koyd),
Shaped like a crow's beak; denoting a process of the scapula.
[G. korakōdēs, like a crow's beak, fr. korax, raven, + eidos, appearance]

coracoid

/cor·a·coid/ (kor´ah-koid)
1. like a crow's beak.

coracoid

(kôr′ə-koid′, kŏr′-)
n.
1. A bony process projecting from the scapula toward the sternum in mammals.
2. A beak-shaped bone articulating with the scapula and sternum in many other vertebrates, such as birds and reptiles.
adj.
Of, relating to, or resembling a coracoid.

cor·a·coid

(kōr'ă-koyd)
Shaped like a crow's beak; denoting a process of the scapula.
[G. korakōdēs, like a crow's beak, fr. korax, raven, + eidos, appearance]

coracoid

A bony process on the outer side of the shoulder-blade (scapula) which projects forward under the outer end of the collar-bone (clavicle).

coracoid

one of a pair of bones that form the ventral part of the pectoral girdle of many vertebrates. In most mammals they are reduced to small processes on the SCAPULA and their role taken over by the CLAVICLES.

coracoid

1. like a crow's beak.
2. the stout bone of the avian shoulder that is braced against the sternum.
3. the coracoid process, a projection from the rim of the glenoid of the scapula.
References in periodicals archive ?
It has been reported that the sternoclavicular artery, axillary artery, intercostal artery and coracoid major artery originate from the subclavian artery and that the ordinal branching pattern of these arteries varies among species (Erdogan, 2012; Glenny, 1944, 1945a, 1953a, b).
Coracoid process is a small hooked structure located on the scapular neck that arises anteriorly and serves as attachment for the coracoacromial, coracoclavicular and coracohumeral ligament, as well as for tendons of the coracobrachial, small pectoral and short head of the biceps brachii muscle.
Plain radiographs showed fracture of the coracoid graft (Fig.
The conoid ligament had been avulsed from the coracoid with a bone fragment of approximately 15 mm x 10 mm.
Coracoid Impingement Syndrome Due to Intensive Rock Climbing Training.
The time of ossification in pectoral girdle and sternum: Scapula, Clavicle, Coracoid, Humerus:
Usually coracobrachialis muscle arises from the apex of the coracoid process, together with the tendon of the short head of the biceps, and also by muscular fibres from the proximal 10 cm of this tendon.
We could only identify one report of a metastatic lesion to the coracoid using a PubMed search of the literature.
Scapulothoracic dyskinesis can progress to an overuse muscular fatigue syndrome called the "SICK syndrome" (Scapular malposition, Inferior medial border prominence, Coracoid pain and malposition, and dysKinesis of scapular movement.
These ligaments are essentially biological pieces of rope, which are wrapped around the coracoid bone in the shoulder and then screwed to the top of the collarbone.
Cinnamond, assistant director of public relations at Tufts, said veterinarians found the bird had injuries to both eyes and a coracoid bone fracture that interfered with flight.
The shoulder is commonly approached through an incision of approximately 10-15 cm extending from the coracoid process to the distal insertion of the deltoid muscle.