copulate

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copulate

(kŏp′yə-lāt′)
intr.v. copu·lated, copu·lating, copu·lates
1. To engage in sexual intercourse in which the penis is inserted into the vagina.
2. To transfer male reproductive cells from one individual to another, usually into an internal organ or cavity, such as a cloaca. Used of animals.
adj. (-lĭt)
Coupled; joined.

cop′u·la′tion n.
cop′u·la·to′ry (-lə-tôr′ē) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hull, "Testosterone restoration of copulatory behaviour correlates with medial preoptic dopamine release in castrated male rats," Hormone and Behaviour, vol.
In this study, copulatory actions of ghrelin and its specific antagonist, DLS, were examined.
In this frame, the authors highlighted the lack of any copulatory lamella in the internal sac of Copris, and the presence of two well differentiated accessory lamellae, named (according to the nomenclature created by Binaghi et al) "parietal accessory lamella" and "(conic) external lamella".
The term epigynum refers to the external parts and the term vulva refers to the internal parts of the female copulatory organ.
Copulatory mechanism in Holocnemus pluchei and Pholcus opilionoides, with notes on male cheliceral apophyses and stridulatory organs in Pholcidae (Araneae).
The results also conveyed a decrease in the number of intromissions and an increase in the number of mounts, thus leading to a decrease in the copulatory efficiency.
Ageneral increase in all evaluated parameters of copulatory behavior was observed in treated animals in comparison with vehicle ones.
Males that had undergone the sixth molt, corresponding to the presence of palps differentiated into copulatory organs, were housed with females in order to observe whether the animals in this phase of the development already demonstrated mating behaviour, which would demonstrate their sexual maturity.
These measures are confounded by the erectile processes (i.e., potency) necessary for successful execution of copulatory patterns.
Other subjects include copulatory structures, signaling and courtship, adaptation and evolution of reproductive mode in copulating cottoid species, fertilization, sex determination, and parental care, as well as reproduction in relation to conservation and exploitation of marine fishes, cryopreservation of gametes, embryogenesis and development, and molecular genetics of the development of the Zebrafish.