copulative


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copulative

(kŏp′yə-lā′tĭv, -lə-tĭv)
adj.
1. Grammar
a. Serving to connect coordinate words or clauses: a copulative conjunction.
b. Serving as a copula: a copulative verb.
2. Of or relating to copulation.
n. Grammar
A copulative word or group of words.

cop′u·la′tive·ly adv.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In this sense, they are not always in the same relation as the minimal pair nice/nicely with verbs that admit an intransitive and a copulative interpretation, like smell, noted by Lyons (1966, cited in Payne et al.
He did so by questioning copulative grammar, problematizing the copula--the to-be verb--itself.
"In its elementary sense the word 'or' is a disjunctive particle that marks an alternative, generally corresponding to 'either,' as 'either this or that.'" (23) But there are also some exceptions, situations "in which the conjunction 'or' is held equivalent in meaning to the copulative conjunction 'and.'" (24) As the D.C.
Copulative behavior ("mounting and dismounting") is described as an internal function of DNA itself (10).
There is also a third type of PV that should be mentioned--which however is not taken into account in this study--called copulative (Viberg 1984) or flip PVs (Rogers 1974).
This copulative methodology allows the cultural history of British religious and political nonconformity to emerge in vibrant readings of Barbauld's devotional writings, Godwin's memoirs of Wollstonecraft, Coleridge's conversation poems, and Thalaba, Southey's Orientalist epic.
* "And" Is Conjunctive or Disjunctive--or Not: "In its elementary sense the word 'or' is a disjunctive particle that marks an alternative, generally corresponding to 'either,' as 'either this or that'..." (21) But there are also some recognized situations "in which the conjunction 'or' is held equivalent in meaning to the copulative conjunction 'and.'" (22)
Baby Boomers were the product of increased copulative opportunities afforded by the end of the Second World War, and the Duck and Covers, having unleashed the power of the atom bomb, lived in guilty fear that another power--namely the Russians--might return the compliment.
The connections rhymes make are mainly copulative, not in the sense we associate with the copula 'is; which wants to say something factual such as "I think therefore I am" or "In the Fall the leaves are brown"; but in the carnal sense implied by the grounds for their conjunction, since they often have no other relation to boast of and are not, in their referents, very much alike (are 'moon' 'spoon' 'loony' 'tune'?), but who are joined by the strength of their physical attraction.
To suggest that the self can be material is to use "be" not as a copulative, between "self " and the idea of materiality, but rather as a kind of springboard, propelling the sentence beyond any recognizable or indeed conceivable idea of the self.