copper sulfate


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cu·pric sul·fate

(kū'prik sŭl'fāt),
A blue salt highly poisonous to algae, it is a prompt and active emetic, and is used as an irritant, astringent, and fungicide.

copper sulfate

CuSO4·5H2O; deep-blue shiny crystals or granular powder. It was used in the past as an astringent and algicide.
References in periodicals archive ?
Keo Fish Farm currently uses copper sulfate to treat all its eggs.
Determination of relative bioavailability of copper in tribasic copper chloride to copper in copper sulfate for broiler chickens based on liver and feather copper concentrations.
Fig 6 shows that the optimal concentration of copper sulfate added to induce laccase enzyme was at 25 [micro]M, a distinctive band was detected at 60 KDa in SDS-PAGE electrophoresis of laccase produced under copper inducing conditions (Figure 6), this band was vaguely present at 50 [micro]M, but did not appear in both control cultures containing no copper or cultures containing 100[micro]M.
Fish were exposed to copper sulfate for 96 hours, without feeding, with daily basis mortality evaluation and removal of dead fish.
In addition, pigment change and zone line stimulation were attempted by treating wood blocks with copper sulfate and subjecting them to dual-fungi inoculation.
On the basis of the MIZ values obtained, Copper sulfate had shown superior antifungal activity compared to chlorhexidine.
Hiorns first dipped a pair of model cathedrals in copper sulfate, his trademark material, back in the mid-'90s; he has repeatedly referenced modernist sculpture, particularly that of Antony Caro; several works share the title Vauxhall; there are two contemporaneous, differently coated and titled versions of The Birth of the Architect (the other is called The Architect's Mother); and so on.
There, Asian mussels were treated and effectively wiped out with aqueous chloride, sodium hypochloride and copper sulfate. However, much of the surrounding sea life was also killed off.
Hydrometallurgical plants use a variety of byproducts, including circuit board scrap and bimetallics, to make cupric oxide, copper sulfate and copper carbonate.
Additionally, it is also known that metal-containing liquid crystals in the form of metal binuclear carboxylates can be readily formed from the simple interaction of long chain sodium carboxylates and simple transition metal salts such as copper sulfate (ref 14).