copper

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copper

 (Cu) [kop´er]
a chemical element, atomic number 29, atomic weight 63.54. (See Appendix 6.) It is necessary for bone formation and for the formation of blood because it occurs in several oxidative enzymes including one involved in the transformation of inorganic iron into hemoglobin. There is little danger of deficiency in ordinary diets because of relatively abundant supply and minute daily requirements. Excessive copper in the body can be toxic, with vomiting, jaundice, hypotension, and sometimes coma; this may occur with excessive intake of medicinal copper salts or in metabolic conditions such as Menkes' syndrome or Wilson's disease.
copper 67 a radioisotope of copper, atomic mass 67, with a half-life of 2.58 days; used in radiotherapy as well as for imaging, tracer kinetic studies, and dosimetry.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

cop·per (Cu),

(kop'er),
A metallic element, atomic no. 29, atomic wt. 63.546; several of its salts are used in medicine. A bioelement found in a number of proteins.
[L. cuprum, orig. Cyprium, fr. Cyprus, where it was mined]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

copper

(kŏp′ər)
n.
A ductile malleable metallic element with atomic number 29 that is a component of various enzymes, is used in its salt forms as an astringent, deodorant, and antifungal, and whose radioisotope is used in brain scans and for diagnosing Wilson disease.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

copper

Biochemistry
A metallic element (atomic number 29; atomic weight 63.56) that is an essential trace mineral linked to key metabolic reactions, including in iron absorption and metabolism, and the formation of red blood cells and nerves; it is present in mollusks, organ meats, nuts, legumes and seeds.
 
Homeopathy
Cuprum met, see there; Cuprum metallicum.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

copper

A metallic element–atomic number 29; atomic weight 63.56; it is an essential trace mineral, and required in certain metabolic reactions–eg, iron absorption and metabolism, and formation of RBCs, nerves
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cop·per

(Cu) (kop'ĕr)
1. A metallic element, atomic no. 29, atomic wt. 63.546; several of its salts are used in medicine.
2. A bioelement found in a number of proteins.
[L. cuprum, orig. Cyprium, fr. Cyprus, where it was mined]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

cop·per

(kop'ĕr)
A metallic element; several of its salts are used in medicine.
[L. cuprum, orig. Cyprium, fr. Cyprus, where it was mined]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about copper

Q. where I can have copper in my diet? I am having arthritis and recently I heard that copper can reduce some pain, from where I can have copper in my diet?

A. Oysters and other shellfish, whole grains, beans, nuts, potatoes, and organ meats (kidneys, liver) are good sources of copper. Dark leafy greens, dried fruits such as prunes, cocoa, black pepper, and yeast are also sources of copper in the diet. be careful in large amounts, copper is poisonous.

More discussions about copper
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References in periodicals archive ?
The MOR data were then subjected to an analysis of variance, followed by unpaired /-tests comparing creosote treatment with either creosote polymer or copper naphthenate treatment.
While cure for 2 hours at 180 [degrees] C was sufficient to cure the system with 0.32% copper naphthenate, the system with 0.16% copper compound required additional time [about 5 hours) to reach maximum attainable cure.
This is a statistically significant difference (Z = -3.3221, P < 0.05), confirming that end-cut preservative treatment with 2 percent copper naphthenate reduces the incidence of decay.
Treatments consisted of injecting or applying a fumigant (WoodFume, Osmose Co.), solvent-borne preservative (copper naphthenate), water-repellent preservative (copper naphthenate plus paraffin), diffusible borate rods (Impel rods, Viance Corp.), waterborne borate preservative (BoraCare, Nisus Corp.), and copper-borate paste (CuRap 20, ISK Biocides).
Water-borne copper naphthenate: A potential new preservative for softwoods, hardwoods, and composites.
Recently, a number of utilities have added copper naphthenate to their specifications, and the presence of copper, a metal well known for its electrical conductivity, has raised questions about the potential impacts of this treatment on conductivity.
The second trial compared the effectiveness of copper sulfate and copper naphthenate, which is registered for wood use.
The frames were cut to size, with two coats of copper naphthenate applied to the cut ends.
Studies using copper naphthenate did not give a similar performance as oxine copper (Sutter et al.
For the second component we employed a number of biocides that either are commercial wood preservatives or have been extensively examined as possible biocides (Nicholas and Schultz 1995): 3-iodo-2-propynylbutyl carbamate; copper naphthenate, copper-8-quinolinolate (Cu-8); 4,5-dichloro-2-n-octyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one; propiconazole; tebuconazole, diiodomethyl-p-tolysulfone, and chlorothalonil.
The effect of steaming after treatment was evaluated for southern pine treated with a waterborne copper naphthenate formulation.
Waterborne copper naphthenate (WBCuN) solutions (0.5% and 1%) were prepared from a 4.9 percent solution of CuNap-5W from Merichem Company (Houston, TX).