copper deficiency


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

copper deficiency

The clinical consequences of inadequate consumption or absorption of dietary copper. Its hallmarks include an unsteady gait, neuropathy, muscle spasticity, and, occasionally, anemia. It may occur as a consequence of gastric bypass surgery or long-term parenteral nutrition.
See also: deficiency
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

copper deficiency

This rare condition occasionally affects young children, causing retardation of growth, rarefaction of bones and anaemia.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The most common hematological abnormalities in copper deficiency are anemia and neutropenia.
The typical neuropathy seen with zinc toxicity and subsequent copper deficiency is axonal in nature, affecting sensory more than motor fibers and lower extremities more than upper extremities.
According to Engle and Spears (2001), copper deficiency causes an increase in plasma cholesterol.
Studies in animals and humans have found that copper deficiency can lead to ID [1, 4] and IDA 6, 7,43].
Wenham, "Biochemical and pathological changes in tissues of Friesian cattle during the experimental induction of copper deficiency," British Journal of Nutrition, vol.
Non significant (P (greater than) 0.05) difference recorded between haemoglobinuric and healthy buffaloes with respect to serum copper concentration and odds ratio of 0.87 indicate that copper deficiency is not associated with parturient haemoglobinuria which is contrary to the previously reported results of Digraskar et al.
"Our findings, plus information from the literature, suggest that copper deficiency could predispose people to develop myopia," Young said.
"Too much zinc, say more than 200 mg a day, is associated with dizziness and fatigue, and may interfere with the absorption of copper, causing a copper deficiency that may contribute to impaired brain function.
A copper deficiency was detected in Exmoor Ranger last season and with that sorted out he proved a different proposition on his reappearane at Ascot in October.
In human adults, severe copper deficiency is relatively rare, whereas signs of moderate copper deficiency were observed in human infants under a variety of conditions [12].