copper deficiency


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copper deficiency

The clinical consequences of inadequate consumption or absorption of dietary copper. Its hallmarks include an unsteady gait, neuropathy, muscle spasticity, and, occasionally, anemia. It may occur as a consequence of gastric bypass surgery or long-term parenteral nutrition.
See also: deficiency

copper deficiency

This rare condition occasionally affects young children, causing retardation of growth, rarefaction of bones and anaemia.
References in periodicals archive ?
A 60-year-old man with early onset copper deficiency after Roux-en-Y surgery was supplemented daily with 4 to 10 mg of oral copper (20).
The etiology of acquired copper deficiency ultimately derives from impaired copper absorption from the gastrointestinal tract.
Radiology and histopathology of lameness in young cattle with secondary copper deficiency.
Developments in the field of plant genetic engineering have been pivotal in defining means to combat copper deficiency.
Two major factors have been found to lead to impaired motor and brain function due to copper deficiency in laboratory animals: the timing and the degree of the deficiency.
According to the letter, these reports, together with the published literature, suggest that excessive use of zinc-containing denture creams may lead to the development of excessive levels of zinc in the blood, associated with copper deficiency.
The copper deficiency level for plants has been reported as 1-5 mg/kg dry mass and the copper toxicity level in plants has said to be more than 20-30 mg/kg dry mass [6].
Copper deficiency causes cardiovascular disease in experimental animals, and supplementing with large doses of zinc has been shown to induce copper deficiency in humans.
We found out last year that he had a copper deficiency, which we've now corrected.
Copper deficiency is known to cause anemia, diarrhoea, bone disorder, change in hair and wool pigmentation, cardio vascular disorder and impaired glucose and lipid metabolism.
Over time, toxic levels of zinc could cause a copper deficiency, which has been linked to neurological damage.
In some geographic regions, high levels of iron, molybdenum or sulfur may tie up copper and accentuate copper deficiency.