copper


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copper

 (Cu) [kop´er]
a chemical element, atomic number 29, atomic weight 63.54. (See Appendix 6.) It is necessary for bone formation and for the formation of blood because it occurs in several oxidative enzymes including one involved in the transformation of inorganic iron into hemoglobin. There is little danger of deficiency in ordinary diets because of relatively abundant supply and minute daily requirements. Excessive copper in the body can be toxic, with vomiting, jaundice, hypotension, and sometimes coma; this may occur with excessive intake of medicinal copper salts or in metabolic conditions such as Menkes' syndrome or Wilson's disease.
copper 67 a radioisotope of copper, atomic mass 67, with a half-life of 2.58 days; used in radiotherapy as well as for imaging, tracer kinetic studies, and dosimetry.

cop·per (Cu),

(kop'er),
A metallic element, atomic no. 29, atomic wt. 63.546; several of its salts are used in medicine. A bioelement found in a number of proteins.
[L. cuprum, orig. Cyprium, fr. Cyprus, where it was mined]

copper

/cop·per/ (Cu) (kop´er) a chemical element, at. no. 29. It is an essential dietary trace element, a necessary component of several enzymes, but is toxic in excess.
copper sulfate  cupric sulfate.

copper

(kŏp′ər)
n.
A ductile malleable metallic element with atomic number 29 that is a component of various enzymes, is used in its salt forms as an astringent, deodorant, and antifungal, and whose radioisotope is used in brain scans and for diagnosing Wilson disease.

copper (Cu)

Etymology: L, cuprum
a malleable, reddish-brown metallic element. Its atomic number is 29; its atomic mass is 63.55. Copper occurs in a pure state in nature and in many ores. It is a component of several important enzymes in the body and is essential to good health. Copper deficiency is rare because only 2 to 5 mg daily, easily obtained from a variety of foods, is sufficient for a proper balance. Copper accumulates in individuals with Wilson's disease, primary biliary cirrhosis, and, occasionally, chronic extrahepatic biliary tract obstruction. It is an excellent conductor of heat and electricity and a valuable component of numerous alloys, and it may be compounded with arsenic to form insecticides. See also ceruloplasmin, hepatolenticular degeneration.

copper

Biochemistry
A metallic element (atomic number 29; atomic weight 63.56) that is an essential trace mineral linked to key metabolic reactions, including in iron absorption and metabolism, and the formation of red blood cells and nerves; it is present in mollusks, organ meats, nuts, legumes and seeds.
 
Homeopathy
Cuprum met, see there; Cuprum metallicum.

copper

A metallic element–atomic number 29; atomic weight 63.56; it is an essential trace mineral, and required in certain metabolic reactions–eg, iron absorption and metabolism, and formation of RBCs, nerves

cop·per

(Cu) (kop'ĕr)
1. A metallic element, atomic no. 29, atomic wt. 63.546; several of its salts are used in medicine.
2. A bioelement found in a number of proteins.
[L. cuprum, orig. Cyprium, fr. Cyprus, where it was mined]

copper,

n an element and essential mineral that may be useful in the treatment of osteoporosis. Excessive consumption of zinc, use of oral contraceptives, or the drug AZT can lead to copper deficiency, but otherwise deficiency is rare. There are no known precautions for copper sup-plementation at nutritional doses, but mega-doses may lead to nausea and vomiting.

cop·per

(kop'ĕr)
A metallic element; several of its salts are used in medicine.
[L. cuprum, orig. Cyprium, fr. Cyprus, where it was mined]

copper,

n a malleable, reddish-brown metallic element. It is a component of several important enzymes in the body and is essential to good health. A deficiency is rare, because only 2 to 5 mg daily are necessary, and that amount is easily obtained in a normal diet.

copper

a chemical element, atomic number 29, atomic weight 63.54, symbol Cu. See Table 6. It is necessary for bone formation and for the formation of blood because it occurs in several oxidative enzymes including one involved in the transformation of inorganic iron into hemoglobin.

copper acetoarsenite
an oldfashioned green pigment used in plaster, wallpaper, etc. A possible cause of chronic arsenic poisoning in very old houses. Called also Paris green.
copper-associated hepatopathy
see bedlington terrier copper-associated hepatopathy.
copper calcium edetate
used as a prophylactic in lambs and calves against swayback and hypocuprosis. Overdosing causes liver damage and severe subcutaneous edema and ascites.
copper-chrome-arsenate poisoning
the preservative in 'treated pine'. Nibbling the wood causes poisoning in confined animals.
copper-molybdenum-sulfate relationship
molybdenum combines with sulfur in the rumen to form Cu-Mo-S complexes (copper-thiomolybdates) which reduce the availability of copper in the ingesta.
copper naphthenate
a complex of copper and naphthenic acid, used as a fungicide and insecticide. A treatment for footrot in cattle and sheep, and for thrush in horses.
copper nutritional deficiency
in ruminants this causes anemia and demyelination in the central nervous system. The deficiency may be primary or secondary due to intervention of high dietary intakes of sulfate and molybdenum. In pigs incoordination and anemia have been recorded. Horses appear unaffected. Called also enzootic ataxia, swayback, coast disease, pine, peat scours, teart, falling disease, hypocuprosis, licking sickness, liksucht. Copper deficiency is rare in dogs and cats and is most likely to occur from excessive supplementation with calcium, which reduces absorption of many minerals, including copper.
copper oxide needles
short lengths given orally to cattle to prevent or control copper deficiency. They lodge in papillae of the rumen and over several months pass to the abomasum where acid digestion makes copper available. They are effective in the control of secondary copper deficiency associated with high molybdenum concentrations in the diet by avoiding the binding of copper in thiomolybdenates which occurs in the rumen.
copper poisoning
may be acute because of accidental administration of inorganic preparations of copper, usually as a worm drench. Chronic poisoning is usually due to grazing on pasture growing on soils naturally rich in copper. The prevalence may be increased by the presence of converter plants, especially subterranean clover, which have a high uptake of copper, or of plants which cause liver damage and the sudden discharge of large amounts of copper which have accumulated in the liver. Such plants are Heliotropium, Senecio and Echium spp. Copper compounds reported to have caused poisoning in animals include the subacetate, oxychloride, chloride, oxide, naphthenate, carbonate, arsenite, sulfate.
Acute poisoning is characterized by gastroenteritis; chronic poisoning is a syndrome of acute hemolytic anemia caused by a sudden elevation of blood copper levels. The obvious signs are jaundice, hemoglobinuria and pallor of mucosae. Poisoning by organic copper preparations administered therapeutically causes nephrosis and death due to uremia. Called also toxemic jaundice. See also bedlington terrier copper-associated hepatopathy.
copper storage disease
see bedlington terrier copper-associated hepatopathy.
copper sulfate
used as a parasiticide in aquariums and in the treatment of foot rot in cattle.

Patient discussion about copper

Q. where I can have copper in my diet? I am having arthritis and recently I heard that copper can reduce some pain, from where I can have copper in my diet?

A. Oysters and other shellfish, whole grains, beans, nuts, potatoes, and organ meats (kidneys, liver) are good sources of copper. Dark leafy greens, dried fruits such as prunes, cocoa, black pepper, and yeast are also sources of copper in the diet. be careful in large amounts, copper is poisonous.

More discussions about copper
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The scientists went further in establishing that copper impairs the sense of smell.
Copper needs to combine with other elements to form a mineral.
The consensus seemed to be that copper scrap was likely to continue its upward climb.
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The evaluation of Nova's in-line Copper metrology system on an Applied Mirra Mesa polisher was conducted for six months at ST's Crolles site using its copper production process and production wafers.
Moisture content can increase to the point that, at vulcanization temperatures, these materials actually supply moisture to catalyze the undesirable copper sulfide formation.
in the 1960s, there was little opportunity for copper permanent mold, said Schweisthal.
The activity comes after Sumitomo, a giant Japanese investment company with $152 billion in sales last year, disclosed that its powerful copper trader, Yasuo Hamanaka, 48, falsified the company's books and records to cover up losses over a 10-year period.
China has now developed to be the world largest country for copper consumption, processing & manufacture and even for copper primary products export.
Additionally, a host of reports estimated that the new copper supply would be muted in the short term in light of the lack of new mining capacity coming on line.