copolymer-1

copolymer-1

acetate salt of a mixture of synthetic polypeptides composed of four amino acids; used to reduce the relapse rate with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

co·pol·y·mer-1

(kō'pol'i-mĕr)
Acetate salt of a mixture of synthetic polypeptides composed of four amino acids; used to reduce the relapse rate with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

copolymer-1

A mixture of synthetic random polypeptides made from the amino acids alanine, glutamic acid, lysine and tyrosine that has been found to reduce the relapse rate in MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS. Research suggests that the drug can reduce the relapse rate, in patients subject to relapses, from 75 per cent to 66 per cent. The drug is believed to act on helper T cells so as to promote cloning of those whose CYTOKINES are mainly B cell antibody-stimulating (Th-2) rather than those whose cytokines have a mainly inflammatory and destructive effect (Th-1). A brand name is Copaxone.
References in periodicals archive ?
This article reviews the results of the rigorously-controlled clinical trial focusing on the use of copolymer-1 in the treatment of patients with relapsing-remitting MS.
Copolymer-1 (Copaxone[R]), is an acetate salt resulting from a mixture of synthetic polypeptides composed of the four amino acids L-alanine L-glutamic acid, L-lysine and L-tyrosine.
Copolymer-1 was first synthesized in 1967, and was studied extensively in animal models.
Copolymer-1 was studied by Johnson et al in 1995, in a multicenter, phase III trial of patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.
Patients who had been treated with copolymer-1 or any other immuno-suppressive therapy, chemotherapy or lymphoid irradiation were also excluded.
Nurses are in a unique position to give patients taking copolymer-1 advice about medication administration and storage, adverse effects, psychological/psychosocial issues, as well as tips for proper administration.