cootie


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cootie

(ko͞o′tē)
n. Slang
A body louse.
A popular term for a body louse—Pediculus humanus
References in periodicals archive ?
Lamb regarded her collecting and quiltmaking as complementary enterprises, conveying her message with seemingly-contradictory items, like the curious juxtaposition of the Virgin Mary and her phalanx of cooties. "It's very poignant to me to see this evidence of these previous lives that these second-hand objects have," she said.
Little's studies have included the Paralyzed Veterans of America (PVA), the American Paraplegia Society (APS), Military Order of Cootie Auxiliary, and the VA Rehabilitation Research & Development Service.
Even his summaries on the careers of Dizzy Gillespie, Mahalia Jackson, Louis Jordan, Dinah Washington and Cootie Williams are informative, warm and respectful, without a hint of scandal or dirt.
The silken glissandi of Johnny Hodges on alto saxophone, the pungent, growling, muted trumpet of Cootie Williams, and the fluent, soaring clarinet of Barney Bigard solo over the matchless Ellington harmonies as the Duke accompanies on piano.
Waking Life opens with a boy pondering the message "Dream is destiny" revealed to him in a little girl's "cootie catcher." He gazes up at a shooting star, wanders over to a car, and holds fast to the door handle as he closes his eyes and dreamily floats off his feet.
Meant to be confidence-inspiring, but in fact containing little that would have been of any real assistance (except, perhaps, to the ex-soldier confronted with a "Hun Cootie"), "Where Do We Go From Here?" essentially prepared its readers for a postwar America in which they would be expected to fend for themselves, regardless of the financial loss that military service often entailed and, even more importantly, regardless of the difficult social and psychological readjustment that many veterans faced once they returned home (a feature of demobilization, incidently, that the pamphlet never mentions).
Creme); Pharoah Sanders, Save Our Children (Verve); Jacky Terrasson, What It Is (Blue Note); Hadda Brooks, I've Got News For You (Pointblank); Ruth Brown, A Good Day For The Blues (Bullseye); Preston Shannon, All In Time (Bullseye); Yvette Freeman, A Tribute To Dinah Washington (Warner Bros.); Cootie Stark, Sugar Man (Cello); Tevin Campbell (Qwest); Morgan Heritage, Don't Haffi Dread (VP); The Roots, Things Fall Apart (MCA), 100% Ginuwine (Sony 50/50); Mr.
Hasse's musical background pays off with clear descriptions of the performing styles of Ellington and his heralded sidemen (especially James "Bubber" Miley, "Tricky" Sam Nanton, Johnny Hodges, and Cootie Williams), and with keen technical observations that convey a broader cultural meaning - for instance, his insight that with the decline of the piano as a mainstay of middle-class homes and the subsequent marketing of cheap spinet pianos, we have lost a sense of how deeply resonant and mellifluous the pianos of Ellington's youth sounded (p.
Another theory, favored by veteran space policy analyst John Pike, is that the program is designed to ''give the Chinese a brain cootie'' trying to figure out what it's for.
Interestingly, Hodeir was a noted jazz critic; his most famous and frequently anthologized essay conferred masterpiece status on Ellington's "Concerto for Cootie" in a style of pained, self-conscious moral exercise worthy of Leavis--or perhaps even of Moliere's Tartuffe.