cooperative learning


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cooperative learning

Education theory A student-centered teaching strategy in which heterogeneous groups of students work to achieve a common academic goal–eg, completing a case study or a evaluating a QC problem. See Problem-based learning, Socratic method.

cooperative learning

An educational strategy in which learners join in small, structured groups to complete educational tasks, solve problems together, and further each other's understanding of material.

cooperative learning

A teaching strategy in which learners join in small structured groups to complete educational tasks, solve problems together, and further each other’s understanding of material.
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Cooperative learning provides one aspect of a test review for students in that they have the opportunity to relook at the test and listen to the thinking process used by their classmates to determine the correct answers.
Survey of actual and preferred use of cooperative learning among exemplar teachers.
Too Good for Drugs Middle School-Revised Edition incorporates the same skills that motivate teens to make healthy decisions and be drug-free, with enhanced lesson design and cooperative learning made easy.
The schools are a unique experiment in cooperative learning - an environment in which students engage with one another as partners rather than opponents.
Contact point(s): South West Bristol Cooperative Learning Trust
On the other hand, the conscious of the active teaching methods and its effect on the educational progression and social skills made the researcher of the present study to investigate the influence of the cooperative learning method on the social skills and educational progression of KHOY City girl students.
Given these differences, high-ability students require different instructional conditions to benefit optimally from assignments based on cooperative learning.
Discussions of group and cooperative learning have often ignored individual difference as potential confounding variable.
Techniques such as Roundtable and the cooperative learning strategy Jigsaw are discussed.
The classroom instructional strategies are geared to four distinct math learning styles: mastery (step-by-step procedures, vocabulary knowledge, not abstract), understanding (reading word problems, developing a mathematical argument), self-expressive (metaphorical expression, modeling and experimentation), and interpersonal (game competition, cooperative learning, real-world applications).
However, I was learning about cooperative learning structures (Kagan & Kagan, 2009) in a graduate mentoring and induction program for beginning teachers, and I wondered if these structures would work in my classroom.

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