cookbook medicine


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A popular term for the practice of medicine by strict adherence to practice guidelines, which may not be an appropriate substitute for clinical judgement

ev·i·dence-based med·i·cine

(ev'i-dĕns-bāst med'i-sin)
The process of applying relevant information derived from peer-reviewed medical literature to address a specific clinical problem; the application of simple rules of science and common sense to determine the validity of the information; and the application of the information to the clinical problem.
See also: Cochrane collaboration, clinical practice guidelines

cookbook medicine

The use of algorithms (in place of individualized care) in medicine; the reliance by practitioners on protocol and rules rather than on a comprehensive, individual approach to the medical needs of a patient.
See also: medicine
References in periodicals archive ?
Prepare to enter the era of cookbook medicine. Health Care Strateg Manage 1989;7:2-3.
For physicians who remain resistant to the notion of standardization of care, likening it to "cookbook medicine," Thomas has this rejoinder: "We were taught cookbook medicine in training--from our mentors.
People who don't understand algorithms might say it's cookbook medicine, but that's not what it is at all."
The physician retains autonomy over the encounter and the patient is not troubled by what he or she may believe is cookbook medicine. Yes, HIPAA is on its way and it's becoming a paperless world.
Physicians have been critical of "cookbook medicine" or expressed concern about the true motives of health plans with statements such as "the HMOs are really just concerned with reducing costs, not improving care."
As for his own efforts to promote clinical protocols as a foundation for the practice of evidence-based medicine, Dyer admits, "to the majority of the medical staff it's still cookbook medicine."
Some view it as "cookbook medicine" because of guidelines that recommend how certain medical conditions are to be evaluated and treated.
They also, quite appropriately, resist overly simplistic "cookbook medicine." They see clinical information systems as trying to tell them how to practice medicine.