cooking

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Related to cook: James Cook

cooking

Nutrition
The preparation of comestibles by heating. In meats, overcooking can result in the production of carcinogenic polycyclic amines; undercooking carries the risk of parasitic (e.g., Taenia solium, T saginatus) or bacterial (e.g., Escherichia coli 0157:H7, Salmonella spp) infections.

cooking

[L. coquere, to cook]
The process of heating foods to prepare them for eating. Cooking makes most foods more palatable and easier to chew, improves their digestibility (and sometimes their nutrient bioavailability), and destroys or inactivates harmful organisms, or toxins that may be present. Cooking releases the aromatic substances and extractives that contribute odors and taste to foods. These odors help to stimulate the appetite.

CAUTION!

Not all toxic substances are inactivated by heat. Most microorganisms and parasites are destroyed in the ordinary process of cooking when the food is heated to internal temperatures of 160°F to 175°F. Pork must be cooked completely throughout to kill the encysted larvae of Trichinella.

Action

Protein: Soluble proteins become coagulated. Soluble substances: These, including heat-labile vitamins, are often inactivated by boiling, and even mineral substances and starches, although insoluble to a certain extent, may be altered in this process. Starch: The starch granules swell and are changed from insoluble (raw) starch to soluble starch capable of being converted into sugar during digestion and of being assimilated in the system.

References in classic literature ?
At last, after a long time had passed, the Cook drew a full, deep breath, as though of much regret, and wiped his hands upon the napkin, for he could eat no more.
Truly, I have trolled one now and then," quoth the Cook, "yet I would not sing alone.
Then the Cook took another draught from the pottle, and, clearing his throat, sang right sweetly:
Glad am I thou likest it, sweet lad," said the Cook.
Now, by my faith," cried the Cook, as he rattled the pottle against the sideboard, "I like that same song hugely, and eke the motive of it, which lieth like a sweet kernel in a hazelnut"
And I had thought to do the same by thee," quoth the Cook, "but I have missed the mark somehow.
What sayst thou, jolly Cook, wilt thou go with me to Sherwood Forest and join with Robin Hood's band?
cried the Cook right heartily, "and, as thou speakest of it, that is the very service for me.
And the Cook seemed lost in amazement, and looked upon his companion with open eyes.
I have brought thee his cook, and even his silver plate.
I am glad thou hast brought thyself back to us, and with such a good companion as the Cook, whom we all welcome to Sherwood.
But I am grieved that thou wilt not feast with me, for thou couldst have victuals to thy liking, for there stands thy Cook.