convertite


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convertite

(1) An obsolete term for a former prostitute.
(2) A convert.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
(236-38) Me, me, adsum qui feci, in me convertite ferrum, O Rutuli!
Such women tended to enter these houses, including th allegedly cloistered Nunnery of the Convertite, of their own free will, to sometimes exit, as Cohen shows, and then reenter.
The foundation documents for the Florentine Convertite are in Archivio di Stato, Firenze, Provvisioni, 26, 8 bis (19 May 1332) and 56 rv (24 Sept.
This history, which in his introduction Dr Harmsen lays out with painstaking care and in great detail, marks out Gee's tract from the run of anti-Roman polemic by giving to it the interest of autobiographical, confessional, and convertite writing.
Thus Jaques says "I am for other than for dancing measures" and goes off to join the "convertite" Duke Frederick, who has ceded his usurped title to his older brother and "put on a religious life"(5.4.193, 181-84).
At the same time, he asked the convertite to remember the centrality of scripture to all the moral lessons in his book: I know that there will be some among you, who have little or no knowledge of sacred scripture, and who will be amazed at how I have been able to produce such a great volume as this one out of two small commandments.
Le pene pecuniarie espresse in lire italiane, convertite in Euro al sensi della legge 28 dicembre 2001, n.
Such institutions for women, like the Zitelle, the Convertite, and the Dimesse, become objects of study as the economic transformations of the city give way to unforeseen alterations of its social fabric.
The many other references to zoccoli or chopines include Casola, 144; Coryat, 262; Barzaghi cites Garzoni's description of women parading through Piazza San Marco as "nane convertite in gigantesche" (100).
Others, like the Casa delle Convertite and the Casa del Soccorso, had different immediate aims and worked with different constituencies.
When Julia Wedgewood wrote to Browning that she was agitated by the darkness of his work, in his lengthy response, he referred to what he saw as the darkest acts to come: "Again, the Convertites who harboured Pompilia, are you prepared for what they did, immediately after her death, and continued doing when her innocence had been made apparent to the world?