conversion

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conversion

 [kon-ver´zhun]
1. the act of changing into something of different form or properties.
2. an unconscious defense mechanism by which the anxiety that stems from intrapsychic conflict is altered and expressed in a symbolic physical symptom such as pain, paralysis, loss of sight, or some other manifestation that has no organic or physiological basis.
3. manipulative correction of malposition of a fetal part during labor.
conversion disorder a somatoform disorder characterized by symptoms or deficits affecting voluntary motor or sensory functioning and suggesting physical illness but produced by conversion. Called also conversion reaction.

Patients' anxiety is “converted” into any of a variety of somatic symptoms such as blindness, deafness, or paralysis, none of which have any organic basis. The anxiety may be the result of an inner conflict too difficult to face, and symptoms are aggravated in times of psychological stress. Patients often exhibit remarkable lack of concern, called la belle indifférence, about their symptoms, no matter how serious.

From their symptoms, patients achieve both the primary gain of relief from their anxiety and a number of secondary gains such as support and attention from others and the chance to avoid unpleasant responsibilities. Symptoms are often increased at times of psychological stress. The symptoms often have an important symbolic relationship to the patient's unconscious conflict, such as incapacitating illness in those who cannot acknowledge dependency needs. Symptoms are neither intentionally produced nor feigned, are not limited to pain or sexual dysfunction, and may affect a part of the body the patient considers weak. One of the first observed examples of conversion disorder was combat fatigue, in which soldiers became paralyzed and could not participate in battle.

Treatment of conversion disorder aims at helping the patient resolve the underlying conflict. Under former classifications, this disorder was called a neurosis (hysterical neurosis, conversion type).
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

con·ver·sion

(kon-ver'zhŭn),
2. A defense mechanism conceptualized by Freud, building on the work of Briquet and Charcot, by which unconscious conflict or repressed thought is expressed symbolically, or somatically.
See also: somatoform disorder, conversion disorder, hysteria.
See also: lysogeny.
3. In virology, the acquisition by bacteria of a new property associated with the presence of a prophage.
See also: lysogeny.
[L. con-verto, pp. -versus, to turn around, to change]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

conversion

(kən-vûr′zhən)
n.
1.
a. The act of converting.
b. The state of being converted.
2. A change in which one adopts a new religion, faith, or belief.
3. Something that is changed from one use, function, or purpose to another.
4. Law The unlawful appropriation of another's property.
5. The exchange of one type of security or currency for another.
6. Logic The interchange of the subject and predicate of a proposition.
7. Football An extra point or points scored after a touchdown, as by kicking the ball through the uprights or by advancing the ball into the end zone from the two-yard line or a similar short distance.
8. Psychiatry The development of physical symptoms, such as paralysis or sensory deficits, as a response to stress, conflict, or trauma.
9. The expression of a quantity in alternative units, as of length or weight.

con·ver′sion·al, con·ver′sion·ar′y (-zhə-nĕr′ē, -shə-) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

conversion

Psychiatry An unconscious defense mechanism by which anxiety caused by intrapsychic conflict is converted and expressed in a somatically symbolic fashion Clinical Paralysis, pain, sensory loss
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

con·ver·sion

(kŏn-vĕr'zhŭn)
1. Synonym(s): transmutation.
2. An unconscious defense mechanism by which the anxiety that stems from an unconscious conflict is converted and expressed symbolically as a physical symptom; transformation of an emotion into a physical manifestation, as in conversion hysteria.
See: conversion hysteria
3. virology The acquisition by bacteria of a new property associated with presence of a prophage.
See also: lysogeny
[L. con-verto, pp. -versus, to turn around, to change]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about conversion

Q. What are the common caloric conversions? Hi my new friends, help me to find out how does caloric expenditure affect weight loss? What are the common caloric conversions?

A. Hi my new friend. Welcome to this community. I have given here the caloric equivalents for your reference:

1 pound = 3500 kcal
1 gram fat = 9 kcal
1 gram carbohydrate = 4 kcal
1 gram protein = 4 kcal
1 gram alcohol = 7 kcal

Example:
How does caloric expenditure affect weight loss?
An individual creates a caloric deficit by walking one mile to and from work each day. Assuming a 100 calorie per mile caloric expenditure, how many weeks would it take to lose one pound?
1 lb = 3500 calories
2 miles per day x 5 days = 10 miles
10 miles x 100 calories = 1000 calories per week
3,500 calories ÷ 1000 = 3.5 weeks

This information is a fundamental for ACE certifications. Knowledge on this subject is required by our professionals.

Q. While in a conversation with anyone they have about a minute before I loose tract and intrest, Is this ADHD I always feel like I have to go full speed 24/7 and can never relax, sounds strange I know but it seems to be catching up with me.

A. not necessarily...i see that you are 31. those symptoms are new? if so- thee are other conditions that might cause them. hyperthyroid can get you in that state too. so it might be a good idea to go and get checked up.

More discussions about conversion
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References in periodicals archive ?
Lawrence Fung, is listed as a participant, even though Fung himself espoused a conservative conversionary theology as well.
Any or all of these sequential movements can be conceived of as conversionary, with Mary repeatedly occupying the position of reforming penitent, and we begin to see that--while conversion might have already occurred with any of them--it also must recur.
Similarly, with the passing of the special theological and conversionary pressures of the fifteenth century due in great measure to the Expulsion, the traditional halakhic leadership no longer had any need to deal with the question of the principles of Judaism and reverted to their customary preoccupations, coupled with ever-increasing attention to Kabbalah.
In either case, their roles can be conversionary helping to transform resources into outputs - or diversionary - transferring resources to non-producers.
Berrahou concentrates on Petrarch's use of both the Augustinian model of conversion and Ovidian metamorphosis in his self-portrait, and his manipulation of Dante's conversionary model as presented in Purgatorio.
And as mystical experience was the starting point of so many of the conversionary case-histories with which my book dealt, I felt bound to try the equipment myself.
Freud, which tends to equate religious, mystical, or conversionary
The agents of "officious" conversion were missionaries and voluntary societies of self-styled "Friends of Israel".(1) Jews in early nineteenth-century Prussia had reason to complain of both kinds of conversionary pressure.
Ludlow's articles for the Atlantic Monthly perfectly reflect the quizzical easterner dryly scrutinizing Eden but then surrendering to transports of conversionary amazement.
Guyer (2004) has suggested that the act of naming conversionary transactions that facilitate connections between different value registers helps to institutionalize these modes of exchange and enables their routinization in local economies.
Such a reaction testifies to changes that many of us who were born in the last few decades take for granted, such as the claims that supersessionism is a sin; that God's covenant with the Jewish people is living and irrevocable; that the deicide charge against the Jewish people is wrong; that Jesus, along with major Gospel figures such as Joseph, Mary, and Peter, were all devout Jews; that Christians can deepen their faith and their experience of Jesus through learning about Jews and Judaism; and that no systemic conversionary attempt of the Jews should be undertaken.
In saying that targeting Jews for conversionary campaigns was not acceptable and that mission could properly consist of working together for justice and peace, it attracted predictable press coverage.