conversion

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conversion

 [kon-ver´zhun]
1. the act of changing into something of different form or properties.
2. an unconscious defense mechanism by which the anxiety that stems from intrapsychic conflict is altered and expressed in a symbolic physical symptom such as pain, paralysis, loss of sight, or some other manifestation that has no organic or physiological basis.
3. manipulative correction of malposition of a fetal part during labor.
conversion disorder a somatoform disorder characterized by symptoms or deficits affecting voluntary motor or sensory functioning and suggesting physical illness but produced by conversion. Called also conversion reaction.

Patients' anxiety is “converted” into any of a variety of somatic symptoms such as blindness, deafness, or paralysis, none of which have any organic basis. The anxiety may be the result of an inner conflict too difficult to face, and symptoms are aggravated in times of psychological stress. Patients often exhibit remarkable lack of concern, called la belle indifférence, about their symptoms, no matter how serious.

From their symptoms, patients achieve both the primary gain of relief from their anxiety and a number of secondary gains such as support and attention from others and the chance to avoid unpleasant responsibilities. Symptoms are often increased at times of psychological stress. The symptoms often have an important symbolic relationship to the patient's unconscious conflict, such as incapacitating illness in those who cannot acknowledge dependency needs. Symptoms are neither intentionally produced nor feigned, are not limited to pain or sexual dysfunction, and may affect a part of the body the patient considers weak. One of the first observed examples of conversion disorder was combat fatigue, in which soldiers became paralyzed and could not participate in battle.

Treatment of conversion disorder aims at helping the patient resolve the underlying conflict. Under former classifications, this disorder was called a neurosis (hysterical neurosis, conversion type).

con·ver·sion

(kon-ver'zhŭn),
2. A defense mechanism conceptualized by Freud, building on the work of Briquet and Charcot, by which unconscious conflict or repressed thought is expressed symbolically, or somatically.
See also: somatoform disorder, conversion disorder, hysteria.
See also: lysogeny.
3. In virology, the acquisition by bacteria of a new property associated with the presence of a prophage.
See also: lysogeny.
[L. con-verto, pp. -versus, to turn around, to change]

conversion

(kən-vûr′zhən)
n.
1.
a. The act of converting.
b. The state of being converted.
2. A change in which one adopts a new religion, faith, or belief.
3. Something that is changed from one use, function, or purpose to another.
4. Law The unlawful appropriation of another's property.
5. The exchange of one type of security or currency for another.
6. Logic The interchange of the subject and predicate of a proposition.
7. Football An extra point or points scored after a touchdown, as by kicking the ball through the uprights or by advancing the ball into the end zone from the two-yard line or a similar short distance.
8. Psychiatry The development of physical symptoms, such as paralysis or sensory deficits, as a response to stress, conflict, or trauma.
9. The expression of a quantity in alternative units, as of length or weight.

con·ver′sion·al, con·ver′sion·ar′y (-zhə-nĕr′ē, -shə-) adj.

conversion

Psychiatry An unconscious defense mechanism by which anxiety caused by intrapsychic conflict is converted and expressed in a somatically symbolic fashion Clinical Paralysis, pain, sensory loss

con·ver·sion

(kŏn-vĕr'zhŭn)
1. Synonym(s): transmutation.
2. An unconscious defense mechanism by which the anxiety that stems from an unconscious conflict is converted and expressed symbolically as a physical symptom; transformation of an emotion into a physical manifestation, as in conversion hysteria.
See: conversion hysteria
3. virology The acquisition by bacteria of a new property associated with presence of a prophage.
See also: lysogeny
[L. con-verto, pp. -versus, to turn around, to change]

Patient discussion about conversion

Q. What are the common caloric conversions? Hi my new friends, help me to find out how does caloric expenditure affect weight loss? What are the common caloric conversions?

A. Hi my new friend. Welcome to this community. I have given here the caloric equivalents for your reference:

1 pound = 3500 kcal
1 gram fat = 9 kcal
1 gram carbohydrate = 4 kcal
1 gram protein = 4 kcal
1 gram alcohol = 7 kcal

Example:
How does caloric expenditure affect weight loss?
An individual creates a caloric deficit by walking one mile to and from work each day. Assuming a 100 calorie per mile caloric expenditure, how many weeks would it take to lose one pound?
1 lb = 3500 calories
2 miles per day x 5 days = 10 miles
10 miles x 100 calories = 1000 calories per week
3,500 calories ÷ 1000 = 3.5 weeks

This information is a fundamental for ACE certifications. Knowledge on this subject is required by our professionals.

Q. While in a conversation with anyone they have about a minute before I loose tract and intrest, Is this ADHD I always feel like I have to go full speed 24/7 and can never relax, sounds strange I know but it seems to be catching up with me.

A. not necessarily...i see that you are 31. those symptoms are new? if so- thee are other conditions that might cause them. hyperthyroid can get you in that state too. so it might be a good idea to go and get checked up.

More discussions about conversion
References in periodicals archive ?
(33.507) In the place of Pater's undead lady--"like the vampire, she has been dead many times"--Ruskin calls us to adore the resurgent martyrdom of a Christian virgin, whose existence resonates typologically across time, whose life is "everywhere" through her saintly intercessions and through our own conversional response to her.
The use of conversional methodology assumes the form of team-building and the establishment or enhancement of corporate culture producing meaningful input from both the bottom up and top down and unifying its people into a cohesive, integrated workforce.
(32.) In a certain sense the assumptions of the moral approach preclude any form of individual help, while help according to the conversional model is restricted to those willing to submit to the discipline of the moral authority concerned.
For testing research hypothesis at first using Pierson's correlation coefficient relation among group working, conversional leadership style and transactional leadership style with job stress were studied and then- using regression analyze role of each variables in predicting job stress was studied.
Pure information ensures that we identify with a concept and go through a conversional process.
This would be another explanation for the decreased daily gain of the animal and loss in feed conversional efficiency (Fatufe and Matanmi, 2008).
4, [PHI] is the heating rate, A is the pre-exponential factor, [E.sub.a] is the activation energy, R is the gas constant, g([alpha](T)) is a conversional function, and T is the absolute temperature.
Such a conversional composition inhomogeneity is likely to be absent if copolymerization is conducted in a CSTR.