convergent evolution


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evolution

 [ev″o-lu´shun]
the process of development in which an organ or organism becomes more and more complex by the differentiation of its parts; a continuous and progressive change according to certain laws and by means of resident forces.
convergent evolution the development, in animals that are only distantly related, of similar structures or functions in adaptation to similar environments.

con·ver·gent ev·o·lu·tion

the evolutionary development of similar structures in two or more species, often widely separated phylogenetically, in response to similarities of environment; for example, the wing-like structures in insects, birds, and flying mammals.

convergent evolution

convergent evolution

the evolution of nonhomologous organs in distantly related species in response to similar environmental conditions. Although of different origin, the organs appear similar in function, shape, or form.

con·ver·gent ev·o·lu·tion

(kŏn-vĕr'jĕnt ev'ŏ-lū'shŭn)
The evolutionary development of similar structures in two or more species, often widely separated phylogenetically, in response to similarities of environment; for example, the wings in insects, birds, and flying mammals.

convergent evolution

1. The process in which phylogenetically distinct lineages acquire similar characteristics.
2. Evolutionary changes in which descendants resemble each other more closely than their progenitors did.

convergence

or

convergent evolution

or

parallelism

a form of evolution which results in unrelated organisms independently producing similarities of form, usually because they become adapted to living in similar types of environment. For example, fish and cetaceans have evolved similar streamlined body shapes and fins.

evolution

the process of development in which an organ or organism becomes more and more complex by the differentiation of its parts; a continuous and progressive change according to certain laws and by means of resident forces.

convergent evolution
the development, in animals that are only distantly related, of similar structures or functions in adaptation to similar environment.
divergent evolution
the development of different characteristics in animals that were closely related in response to being placed in different environments.
References in periodicals archive ?
Convergent evolution of amino acid usage in archaebacterial and eubacterial lineages adapted to high salt.
In many cases of convergent evolution, says Cunningham, the benefits of a structure or form are obvious, such as the hydrodynamic body shape of marine predators like dolphins and sharks.
It's always possible that convergent evolution could cause a particular physical feature to evolve, de Jong notes.
Objective: The ComPAg research program will produce the first global comparative synthesis of the convergent evolution of domesticated plants and early agricultural systems based primarily on empirical archaeobotanical data.
Washington, Jan 23 ( ANI ): Several populations of cavefish have constantly and independently, lost their eyesight and pigmentation, which is a remarkable example of convergent evolution, researchers say.
This kind of event, a molecular version of convergent evolution, makes two animals' sequences look similar even though they may be only distantly related.
I have recently shown that the two unrelated proteins share impressive functional similarity, which indicates a compelling case of convergent evolution and open the possibility that Nef and Glycogag are part of a novel class of fundamental retrovirus infectivity factors.
When two animals arrive at the same endpoint, in this case, these similar feeding structures, via different processes, it is called convergent evolution.
They regard any similarity between birds and dinosaurs as an example of convergent evolution, by which two independent groups grow to look alike.
It appears that both sharks and marine mammals may have arrived at the same visual design by convergent evolution, in other words, they acquired the same biological trait in unrelated lineages," said Hart.
Because the rest of the clock genes are quite different between plants and humans, Harmer thinks that the fact that a very similar gene has the same function in both plants and humans is probably an example of convergent evolution, rather than something handed down from a distant common ancestor.
Consequently, the two groups of eyes have been thought a classic example of convergent evolution.