convergent evolution


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evolution

 [ev″o-lu´shun]
the process of development in which an organ or organism becomes more and more complex by the differentiation of its parts; a continuous and progressive change according to certain laws and by means of resident forces.
convergent evolution the development, in animals that are only distantly related, of similar structures or functions in adaptation to similar environments.

con·ver·gent ev·o·lu·tion

the evolutionary development of similar structures in two or more species, often widely separated phylogenetically, in response to similarities of environment; for example, the wing-like structures in insects, birds, and flying mammals.

convergent evolution

con·ver·gent ev·o·lu·tion

(kŏn-vĕr'jĕnt ev'ŏ-lū'shŭn)
The evolutionary development of similar structures in two or more species, often widely separated phylogenetically, in response to similarities of environment; for example, the wings in insects, birds, and flying mammals.

convergent evolution

1. The process in which phylogenetically distinct lineages acquire similar characteristics.
2. Evolutionary changes in which descendants resemble each other more closely than their progenitors did.

convergence

or

convergent evolution

or

parallelism

a form of evolution which results in unrelated organisms independently producing similarities of form, usually because they become adapted to living in similar types of environment. For example, fish and cetaceans have evolved similar streamlined body shapes and fins.
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References in periodicals archive ?
We fitted [H.sub.0] as a null hypothesis in which no adaptive evolution occurred for the branches from parsimonious inference of convergent evolution (see above method) fixing [[omega].sub.2] = 1 forcibly, and [H.sub.1] as an alternative hypothesis in which adaptive evolution occurred for the branches and [[omega].sub.2] >1 is estimated.
In such cases, acquisition of traits by nonvertical (e.g., HGT fluxes, convergent evolution) or confounding (e.g., differential loss that mimics HGT) evolutionary processes becomes more likely.
Convergent evolution is less of a problem in trees that are based on genetic evidence, Springer says.
Convergent evolution is also a probable cause for structural homology [36].
As discussed in my article "Convergent Evolution or Head-on Collision: Parallel Programming Approaches for MIC and GPU," running as a standalone device might be limited by the processing time of sequential sections of code (due to slow Pentium performance relative to a modern high-clock rate processing core), on-board memory capacity limitations, and the ability of the application to use the wide vector unit.
Convergent evolution of eye ultrastructure and divergent evolution of vision-mediated predatory behaviour in jumping spiders.
Convergent evolution as a mechanism for pathogenic adaptation.
After all, different species sometimes develop similar features separately - a process known as ''convergent evolution.''
In several cases the passages quoted may indicate convergent evolution of ideas rather than transfer of concepts.
In addition to particular taxonomic groups, they look at classification, parallel and convergent evolution, floral diversification, and the evolution of genome size and base chromosome number.
The so-called co-evolution, parallel evolution, convergent evolution, and so on are nothing but events resulting from programmed timing and scheduling of development of individuals from the end cells representing various species.