convection

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current

 [kur´ent]
1. something that flows.
2. specifically, electricity transmitted through a circuit.
alternating current a current that periodically flows in opposite directions; its amplitude fluctuates as a sine wave.
convection current a current caused by movement by convection of warmer fluid into an area of cooler fluid.
direct current a current that flows in one direction only; when modeled as a wave, its amplitude is constant. When used medically it is called galvanic current. This current has distinct and important polarity and marked secondary chemical effects.
galvanic current a steady direct current.
current of injury an electric current that flows between injured myocardium and normal myocardium, because such cells have a reduced membrane potential; it may be either diastolic or systolic.
current of injury, diastolic the current that flows from injured to noninjured tissue during electrical diastole.
current of injury, systolic the current that flows from healthy tissue to injured tissue during electrical systole.
inwardly rectifying current current that rectifies so that it passes more easily towards the interior of a cell.
leakage current the electrical current that exists in the parts or metal case of electrical equipment.
outwardly rectifying current current that rectifies so that it passes more easily towards the exterior of a cell.
potassium rectifying c's transmembrane currents that rectify inwardly or outwardly to make adjustments in cellular functions; they are mainly responsible for the repolarization phase of the action potential. There are at least six mechanisms by which potassium ions move across cardiac cell membranes in the role of rectifier.

con·vec·tion

(kon-vek'shŭn),
Conveyance of heat in liquids or gases by movement of the heated particles, as when the layer of water at the bottom of a heated pot rises or the warm air of a room ascends to the ceiling.
[L. con-veho, pp. -vectus, to carry or bring together]

con·vec·tion

(kŏn-vek'shŭn)
Conveyance of heat in liquids or gases by movement of the heated particles, as when the layer of water at the bottom of a heated pot rises or the warm air of a room ascends to the ceiling.
[L. con-veho, pp. -vectus, to carry or bring together]

convection

the propagation of heat through liquids and gases by the movement of the heated particles, increasing their kinetic energy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Scientists were able to predict the increasing potential for convective storm development as the boundary between the maritime tropical air in the Southeast and the dry, continental air to the north and west continued to strengthen.
This pattern that is favorable for the maintenance of convective instability in lower levels maintained stably in the rainstorm area except that the center of high equivalent potential temperature slowly moved eastward and was out of the rainstorm area by 2200 UTC.
By applying the assumption of steady heat transfer for the present study, the convective heat transfer can be calculated by multiplying the simultaneous heat transfer coefficient, the instantaneous heat exchange area and the temperature difference [10]:
In regard to the combination procedure of the impulsive forces and the convective forces, Eurocode 8 suggests the absolute sum combination procedure of the impulsive forces and the convective forces, while the ACI, NZS, and IS suggest the Square Root Sum of the Squares method (SRSS) [14, 16, 17].
To obtain the convective heat transfer coefficients under different drying conditions, temperatures at specific locations inside the wood samples were measured and results are shown in Figure 5.
Warming blanket with convective air warming system covered chest, both arms and head to keep body temperature normal (Fig.1).
Convective vortex-like motions are identified as sinks (darker areas) where the horizontal velocity vectors converge and the vertical velocities have magnitudes up to 0.9 km.[s.sup.-1].
Several authors [6-11] have presented various aspects of the convective heat flow problems through porous media.
Convective warming blankets are designed to help surgical patients arrive in recovery normothermic (normal body temperature).
In 1968, scientists theorized that even longer-lived and larger convection cells, big enough to span the entire convective zone, maintain the fast rotation researchers had long observed around the sun's equator; without such cells, the poles should rotate faster than the equator.
This means that radiant cooling systems may impact zone cooling loads in several ways: (1) heat is removed from the zone through an additional heat transfer pathway (radiant heat transfer) compared to air systems, which rely on convective heat transfer only; (2) by cooling the inside surface temperatures of non-active exterior building walls, higher heat gain through the building envelope may result; and (3) radiant heat exchange with non-active surfaces also reduces heat accumulation in building mass, thereby affecting peak cooling loads.