convection

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current

 [kur´ent]
1. something that flows.
2. specifically, electricity transmitted through a circuit.
alternating current a current that periodically flows in opposite directions; its amplitude fluctuates as a sine wave.
convection current a current caused by movement by convection of warmer fluid into an area of cooler fluid.
direct current a current that flows in one direction only; when modeled as a wave, its amplitude is constant. When used medically it is called galvanic current. This current has distinct and important polarity and marked secondary chemical effects.
galvanic current a steady direct current.
current of injury an electric current that flows between injured myocardium and normal myocardium, because such cells have a reduced membrane potential; it may be either diastolic or systolic.
current of injury, diastolic the current that flows from injured to noninjured tissue during electrical diastole.
current of injury, systolic the current that flows from healthy tissue to injured tissue during electrical systole.
inwardly rectifying current current that rectifies so that it passes more easily towards the interior of a cell.
leakage current the electrical current that exists in the parts or metal case of electrical equipment.
outwardly rectifying current current that rectifies so that it passes more easily towards the exterior of a cell.
potassium rectifying c's transmembrane currents that rectify inwardly or outwardly to make adjustments in cellular functions; they are mainly responsible for the repolarization phase of the action potential. There are at least six mechanisms by which potassium ions move across cardiac cell membranes in the role of rectifier.

con·vec·tion

(kon-vek'shŭn),
Conveyance of heat in liquids or gases by movement of the heated particles, as when the layer of water at the bottom of a heated pot rises or the warm air of a room ascends to the ceiling.
[L. con-veho, pp. -vectus, to carry or bring together]

con·vec·tion

(kŏn-vek'shŭn)
Conveyance of heat in liquids or gases by movement of the heated particles, as when the layer of water at the bottom of a heated pot rises or the warm air of a room ascends to the ceiling.
[L. con-veho, pp. -vectus, to carry or bring together]

convection

the propagation of heat through liquids and gases by the movement of the heated particles, increasing their kinetic energy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Assuming the system as the triangular enclosure with discrete heating from the bottom plate and natural convection taking place at surface of the plate.
Natural Convection at Inner Surface of the Glass Chamber.
If Gr/[Re.sup.2] < 1, natural convection is dominant.
Hagentoft (1993) were used for the numerical modelling of convection. The introduced programs are used for estimating heat transfer in walls where heat is transmitted by the air moving in small gaps and for establishing the place where at the same time it expands by conduction through air impermeable layers of thermal-insulating materials.
The influence of convection on stationary heat transmission through the wall having small ventilated and non-ventilated air gaps was calculated using the above mentioned software (Fig.
The achieved results have disclosed that the effect of natural convection on heat transfer through the thermal-insulating layer mostly depends on the thickness of a small air gap and difference in temperature but rather insignificantly on the tightness of the gap.
The matrix [E] is resulting from the linear operator describing the pure thermal convection. The N(1+ Le) is a weighting term for the specie factor.
The instability via oscillatory convection will be now discussed.
In what follows we develop a meticulous discussion of the convective problem, namely we begin by the particular case of natural convection without Soret effect, and then we pass to the driven effect resulting of the effect of Soret phenomena.
Turbulent Convection and Radiation Heat Transfer Validation.
In the other words, the effect of natural, mixed, or forced convection heat transfer inside the enclosure can totally disappear when the effect of radiation is considered in the calculation.
In this state, the temperature difference range is more compact than with pure convection. The difference is 1.5 K near the upper wall and 1.3 K near the lower wall.