convalescent serum


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con·va·les·cent se·rum

serum from patients recently recovered from a disease; useful for diagnosis by demonstrating a fourfold increase in specific antibodies or in preventing or modifying by passive immunization the same disease in exposed susceptible people.

convalescent serum

Serum from a person who has recuperated from a particular infection–eg, scarlet fever, which may be of use in treating a person with the same infection; while acute-phase serum has ↑ IgM antibodies, CS has ↓ IgM, and ↑ IgG antibodies

convalescent serum

Serum from a person recovering from an infection.
See also: serum
References in periodicals archive ?
The MRC's evidence in 1928 for the efficacy of the serum is doubtful and, by 1936, convalescent serum had been characterized as harmless, and ineffectual.
A total of 169 reported suspect cases and 38 reported probable cases were excluded because the convalescent serum specimen was negative for SARS-CoV antibodies (Table).
However, the collection and testing of convalescent serum is an ongoing priority to precisely characterize the epidemiology of SARS in the United States and worldwide.
In these instances, a convalescent serum specimen obtained >21 days after illness is needed to determine infection with SARS-CoV.
patients, particularly those with milder clinical illness, have tested negative for SARS-Co V, reflecting the low specificity of the current case definition, which captures persons with respiratory infections caused by other infectious agents, and underscoring the importance of obtaining convalescent serum samples to make a final determination about infection with SARS-Co V.
All suspect WNV illnesses should be screened by testing CSF and appropriately timed acute and convalescent serum specimens for IgM ELISA antibody.
Acute and convalescent serum specimens were available from six patients (including five of the seven patients for whom PCR was performed and one patient for whom PCR testing was not performed); these paired serum specimens were tested at CDC for antibodies by the Remel test.
Confirmatory testing by plaque reduction neutralization for IgG antibody from convalescent serum is pending.
Acute and convalescent serum specimens were tested for dengue antibodies using the hemagglutination inhibition assay and IgM antibody capture enzyme linked immunosorbent assay [3,4].
Laboratory evidence for leptospirosis was defined as 1) a positive result for Leptospira on screening 1gM enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with confirmatory testing by a single microagglutination test (MAT) titer of [equal to or greater than]400, or a four-fold or greater rise in MAT titer between acute-phase and convalescent serum specimens (2); 2) a positive tissue immunohistochemical (IHC) stain using rabbit polyclonal reference antiserum reactive with 16 different leptospiral strains (3); or 3) a positive culture.
Paired, 2-week convalescent serum specimens are being obtained for the 18 patients (these 16 patients and the first two patients) whose acute-phase serum specimens (three positive and 15 negative) have been tested.
Of the 23 cases, 15 were included in the case-control study (one person died before the case-contol study was initiated and had no available exposure history, and seven patients were identified after convalescent serum became available 2 months following the case-control study).