controlled substance


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substance

 [sub´stans]
1. physical material that has form and weight; called also matter.
2. the material constituting an organ or body.
substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) an agency of the United States Department of Health and Human Services, created in 1992 to oversee the quality and availability of programs for prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation of substance abuse and related mental health problems.
black substance substantia nigra.
controlled substance a psychoactive substance that is regulated under the controlled substances act. See table at drug dependence.
depressor substance
gray substance gray matter.
ground substance the gel-like material in which connective tissue cells and fibers are embedded.
substance-induced disorders a subgroup of the substance-related disorders comprising a variety of behavioral or psychological anomalies resulting from ingestion of or exposure to a drug of abuse, medication, or toxin. Included are substance intoxication, substance withdrawal, and other mental disorders such as dementia, mood disorder, and psychotic disorder when they are specifically caused by a substance. See also substance use disorders.
medullary substance
1. the white matter of the central nervous system, consisting of axons and their myelin sheaths.
2. the soft, marrow-like substance of the interior of such structures as bone, kidney, and adrenal gland.
müllerian inhibiting substance a glycoprotein produced by the Sertoli cells of the fetal testis that acts ipsilaterally in the male to suppress the müllerian ducts, consequently preventing development of the uterus and fallopian tubes, thus helping to control formation of the male phenotype.
substance P a peptide composed of 11 amino acids, present in nerve cells scattered throughout the body and in special endocrine cells in the gut; it increases the contractions of gastrointestinal smooth muscle and causes vasodilatation; it is one of the most potent vasoactive substances known, and it seems to be a sensory neurotransmitter involving pain, touch, and temperature.
perforated substance
1. anterior perforated substance, an area anterolateral to each optic tract, pierced by branches of the anterior and middle cerebral arteries.
2. posterior perforated substance, an area between the cerebral peduncles, pierced by branches of the posterior cerebral arteries.
pressor substance vasopressor (def. 2).
psychoactive substance (psychotropic substance) any chemical compound that affects the mind or mental processes, particularly a drug used therapeutically in psychiatry, or any of various other types of mind-altering substances such as drugs of abuse and some toxins. See also table at drug dependence. Called also psychoactive agent or drug and psychotropic agent or drug.



There are several different classes of psychoactive substances: antidepressants are used for the relief of symptoms of major depression. lithium is the most common agent used to treat manic episodes of bipolar disorder. antipsychotic agents (or major tranquilizers) are used for management of the manifestations of psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia. antianxiety agents (called also minor tranquilizers), such as diazepam (Valium), are used for relief of anxiety disorders. While none of these drugs can effect a cure, they can reduce the severity of symptoms and permit the patient to resume more normal activity.

Also included in the category of psychotropic drugs are many other substances that affect the mind but are not used to treat mental disorders, including stimulants such as caffeine, amphetamines, and cocaine; opiates; and hallucinogens.
substance-related disorders any of the mental disorders associated with excessive use of or exposure to psychoactive substances, including drugs of abuse, medications, and toxins. The group is divided into substance use disorders and substance-induced disorders, each of which is specified on the basis of etiology, such as alcohol use disorders. See also drug abuse and drug dependence.
slow-reacting substance of anaphylaxis SRS-A, an inflammatory agent released by mast cells in the anaphylactic reaction. It induces slow, prolonged contraction of certain smooth muscles and is an important mediator of allergic bronchial asthma.
threshold s's those substances in the blood, such as glucose, that are excreted when they reach their renal threshold.
transmitter substance neurotransmitter.
substance use disorders a subgroup of the substance-related disorders, in which psychoactive substance use or abuse repeatedly results in significantly adverse consequences. The group comprises substance abuse (see drug abuse) and substance dependence (see drug dependence); specific disorders or groups of disorders are named on the basis of etiology, e.g., alcohol use disorders, alcohol abuse, and alcohol dependence.
white substance white matter.

con·trolled sub·stance

a substance subject to the U.S. Controlled Substances Act (1970), which regulates the prescribing and dispensing, as well as the manufacturing, storage, sale, or distribution of substances assigned to five schedules according to their 1) potential for or evidence of abuse, 2) potential for psychic or physiologic dependence, 3) contribution to a public health risk, 4) harmful pharmacologic effect, or 5) role as a precursor of other controlled substances.

controlled substance

(kən-trōld′)
n.
A drug or chemical substance whose possession and use are prohibited by or regulated under the federal Controlled Substances Act or an analogous state law.

controlled substance

Etymology: Fr, controle, to register; L, substantia, essence
any drug defined in the five categories of the federal Controlled Substances Act of 1970. The categories, or schedules, cover opium and its derivatives, hallucinogens, depressants, and stimulants. Schedule I drugs have a high abuse potential and no approved medical uses. Drugs in Schedules II to V all have approved medical indications, with decreasing abuse and dependence liabilities as the schedule number increases.

con·trolled sub·stance

(kŏn-trōld' sŭb'stăns)
A substance subject to the U.S. federal Controlled Substances Act (1970), which regulates the prescribing and dispensing, as well as the manufacturing, storage, sale, or distribution, of substances assigned to five schedules according to their: 1) potential for or evidence of abuse; 2) potential for psychic or physiologic dependence; 3) role in putting the health of the public at risk; 4) harmful pharmacologic effect; or 5) role as a precursor of other controlled substances.

con·trolled sub·stance

(kŏn-trōld' sŭb'stăns)
Substance subject to U.S. ControlledSubstances Act (1970), which regulates prescribing and dispensing, as well as manufacturing, storage, sale, or distribution of substances assigned to five schedules according to their 1) potential for or evidence of abuse, 2) potential for psychic or physiologic dependence, 3) contribution to a public health risk, 4) harmful pharmacologic effect, or 5) role as a precursor of other controlled substances.

controlled substance,

a drug as defined in the five categories of the federal Controlled Substances Act of 1970. The categories, or schedules, cover opium and its derivatives, hallucinogens, depressants, and stimulants.

substance

the material constituting an organ or body.

black substance
substantia nigra.
controlled substance
depressor substance
a substance that tends to decrease activity or blood pressure.
gray substance
nerve tissue composed of predominantly nerve cell bodies, unmyelinated nerve fibers, and supporting tissue. See also gray matter.
ground substance
the gel-like material in which connective tissue cells and fibers are embedded.
medullary substance
1. the white matter of the central nervous system, consisting of axons and their myelin sheaths.
2. the soft, marrow-like substance of the interior of such structures as bone, kidney and adrenal gland.
substance P
an undecapeptide present in the intestine, where it induces contraction of the intestine and dilatation of blood vessels; it is also present in a number of neuronal pathways in the brain and in primary sensory fibers of peripheral nerves, and may be a neurotransmitter associated with transmission of pain impulses.
perforated substance
1. anterior perforated substance, an area anterolateral to each optic tract, pierced by branches of the anterior and middle cerebral arteries.
2. posterior perforated substance, an area between the cerebral peduncles, pierced by branches of the posterior cerebral arteries.
pressor substance
a substance that raises blood pressure.
reticular substance
the netlike mass of threads seen in erythrocytes after vital staining.
slow-reacting substance
threshold s's
those substances (e.g. glucose) excreted into the urine only when their concentration in plasma exceeds a certain value.
white substance
tissue consisting mostly of myelinated nerve fibers and constituting the conducting portion of the brain and spinal cord; see also white matter.
References in periodicals archive ?
Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit upheld the revocation of a distributor's DEA registration for failure to identify suspicious orders of controlled substances.
Think bank, checkbook, and money; if you have controlled substances, you need to keep the same records," Mr.
A new GuidedHealth Care Program, which includes direct member intervention and may enroll members in a pharmacy home or single prescriber for their controlled substance medicines to increase safety for those members most at risk for misuse.
Finally, Schedule V drugs are considered to be the least dangerous of the controlled substances.
begin strikethrough]If a person does not have exclusive possession of a controlled substance, knowledge of its presence may not be inferred or assumed.
It is now a felony for unauthorized use or disclosure of the controlled substances database information and is punishable by imprisonment for 1-5 years or fined $3,000-$10,000, or both.
The law also requires that, in addition to the BON, the Healing Arts Board, Pharmacy Board and the Department of Healthand Senior Services all have to approve any rules and regulations that may be adopted relating to the prescription of controlled substances by APRNs.
The agency said it "wishes to dispel the mistaken notion among a small number of medical professionals that the agency has embarked on a campaign to 'target' physicians who prescribe controlled substances for the treatment of pain (or that physicians must curb their legitimate prescribing of pain medications to avoid legal liability).
Only a tiny fraction of the nation's nearly I million health care professionals licensed to prescribe controlled substances are willing to consistently use opioid medications, recognized as the best drugs for severe pain.
Ashcroft's order neither exceeds his authority under the Controlled Substance Act nor challenges the will of Congress and should, therefore, be given "substantial deference," Wallace wrote.
Internet pharmacies would have to be certified under the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy's Verified Internet Pharmacy Practice Sites program or meet certain other requirements, including a display of identifying information and provider verification of a script for a Schedule II, II or IV controlled substance.

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