control group


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Related to control group: independent variable

group

 [gro̳p]
1. an assemblage of objects having certain things in common.
2. a number of atoms forming a recognizable and usually transferable portion of a molecule.
activity g's groups of individuals with similar needs for occupational therapy who are working on the correction of problems that they hold in common.
azo group the bivalent radical, -N=N-.
blood group see blood group.
control group see control (def. 3).
Diagnosis-Related G's see diagnosis-related groups.
encounter group a sensitivity group in which the members strive to gain emotional rather than intellectual insight, with emphasis on the expression of interpersonal feelings in the group situation.
focus g's individuals with a common interest who meet to explore a problem in depth.
PLT group [psittacosis-lymphogranuloma venereum-trachoma] alternative name for genus Chlamydia.
prosthetic group
1. an organic radical, nonprotein in nature, which together with a protein carrier forms an enzyme.
2. a cofactor tightly bound to an enzyme, i.e., it is an integral part of the enzyme and not readily dissociated from it.
3. a cofactor that may reversibly dissociate from the protein component of an enzyme; a coenzyme.
sensitivity group (sensitivity training group) a nonclinical group intended for persons without severe emotional problems, focusing on self-awareness, self-understanding, and interpersonal interactions and aiming to develop skills in leadership, management, counseling, or other roles. Called also T-group and training group.
support group
1. a group made up of individuals with a common problem, usually meeting to express feelings, vent frustrations, and explore effective coping strategies. Education is a component of some support groups.
2. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the use of a group environment to provide emotional support and health-related information for members.
support group (omaha) in the omaha system, regular planned gatherings to accomplish some compatible goal.
group therapy a form of psychotherapy in which a group of patients meets regularly with a group leader, usually a therapist. The group may be balanced, having patients with diverse problems and attitudes, or it may be composed of patients who all have similar diagnoses or issues to resolve. In some groups, patients may be basically mentally healthy but trying to work through external stressors, such as job loss, natural disasters, or physical illness. Self-help groups are groups of people with a commonality of diagnosis (e.g., alcoholism, overeating, or a particular chronic physical illness) or of experience (e.g., rape, incest) and a leader who may be not a therapist but rather one who has experienced a similar problem or situation.

From hearing how the group leader or other members feel about this behavior, the patient may gain insight into his or her anxieties and conflicts. The group may provide emotional support for self-revelation and a structured environment for trying out new ways of relating to people. In contrast, there are other groups that focus on altering behavior, with less or minimal attention paid to gaining insight into the causes of the problems.
therapy group in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the application of psychotherapeutic techniques to a group, including the utilization of interactions between members of the group. See also group therapy.
training group sensitivity group.

con·trol group

in a group of subjects participating in the same experiment as another group of subjects, the control group is not exposed to the variable under investigation.
See also: experimental group.

control group

n.
A group used as a standard of comparison in a controlled experiment.

control group

The group of subjects in a controlled clinical trial that receives no treatment, a standard treatment or a placebo.

con·trol group

(kŏn-trōl' grūp)
A group of subjects participating in the same experiment as another group of subjects, but not exposed to the variable under investigation.
See also: experimental group

con·trol group

(kŏn-trōl' grūp)
Subjects participating in the same experiment as another group, but not exposed to the variable under investigation.
References in periodicals archive ?
The major risk factor in both the groups was smoking, accounting for 60% (18 cases) and 66.67% (20 cases) in the study and the control group, respectively.
Section was significantly shorter compared to the control group (p=0.016).13 This study aim was to determine the effect of sugar-free gum chewing on bowel function postoperatively in women following cesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia.
The results of western blotting showed that the levels of [beta]-catenin, Runx2, osteocalcin (OCN), and OPG in the WT SR group were significantly higher than those in the WT control group, but there was no statistical difference between the KO control group and KO SR group.
In our present study, the mean age of the patient in control group was 50 years and study group was 48 years.
A unilateral PEX group and control group (cataract patients without pseudoexfoliation) were compared in this study.
A difference in the ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax at each time point of administration between the saline group and the normal control group was not observed (P > 0.05) (Figure 3).
As it can be seen, there is an improvement, from the initial assessment to the final assessment of the mean value by 13 cm for the experimental group and by 9 cm in the control group, an increase in weight by 2.84 kg for the experimental group and by 3.28 kg in the control group as well as an increase of 11.64 cm for the experimental group and of 4.14 cm for the control group, which are within the normal evolution of children at this age.
On the 21[sup]th day postoperatively, mice from normal control group had no symptoms relating hindlimb ischemia while mice from the blank control group, VEGF group and NGF group had various ischemia on affected legs.
Then, in all groups experimental infection was created, the concentrations of serum TNF-[alpha], IL-1[beta] and IL-6 were found to be higher than in the control group. In our study, the lowest (P < 0.0001) concentrations of serum TNF-[alpha], IL-1[beta] and IL-6 were determined in group C, as well.
For a valid and meaningful study, it was essential to have a control group or groups matched as closely as possible to the URP group.
The disease prevention program for the control group also included four weekly sessions; in both the intervention and control groups, participants' female partners were invited to attend sessions held specifically for them.
Similarly, both Physician and Subject Global Aesthetic Improvement Scale (PGAIS/SGAIS) scores diverged during a 6-month evaluator-blinded phase of the study, then converged after crossover by the control group subjects.