control group


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Related to control group: independent variable

group

 [gro̳p]
1. an assemblage of objects having certain things in common.
2. a number of atoms forming a recognizable and usually transferable portion of a molecule.
activity g's groups of individuals with similar needs for occupational therapy who are working on the correction of problems that they hold in common.
azo group the bivalent radical, -N=N-.
blood group see blood group.
control group see control (def. 3).
Diagnosis-Related G's see diagnosis-related groups.
encounter group a sensitivity group in which the members strive to gain emotional rather than intellectual insight, with emphasis on the expression of interpersonal feelings in the group situation.
focus g's individuals with a common interest who meet to explore a problem in depth.
PLT group [psittacosis-lymphogranuloma venereum-trachoma] alternative name for genus Chlamydia.
prosthetic group
1. an organic radical, nonprotein in nature, which together with a protein carrier forms an enzyme.
2. a cofactor tightly bound to an enzyme, i.e., it is an integral part of the enzyme and not readily dissociated from it.
3. a cofactor that may reversibly dissociate from the protein component of an enzyme; a coenzyme.
sensitivity group (sensitivity training group) a nonclinical group intended for persons without severe emotional problems, focusing on self-awareness, self-understanding, and interpersonal interactions and aiming to develop skills in leadership, management, counseling, or other roles. Called also T-group and training group.
support group
1. a group made up of individuals with a common problem, usually meeting to express feelings, vent frustrations, and explore effective coping strategies. Education is a component of some support groups.
2. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the use of a group environment to provide emotional support and health-related information for members.
support group (omaha) in the omaha system, regular planned gatherings to accomplish some compatible goal.
group therapy a form of psychotherapy in which a group of patients meets regularly with a group leader, usually a therapist. The group may be balanced, having patients with diverse problems and attitudes, or it may be composed of patients who all have similar diagnoses or issues to resolve. In some groups, patients may be basically mentally healthy but trying to work through external stressors, such as job loss, natural disasters, or physical illness. Self-help groups are groups of people with a commonality of diagnosis (e.g., alcoholism, overeating, or a particular chronic physical illness) or of experience (e.g., rape, incest) and a leader who may be not a therapist but rather one who has experienced a similar problem or situation.

From hearing how the group leader or other members feel about this behavior, the patient may gain insight into his or her anxieties and conflicts. The group may provide emotional support for self-revelation and a structured environment for trying out new ways of relating to people. In contrast, there are other groups that focus on altering behavior, with less or minimal attention paid to gaining insight into the causes of the problems.
therapy group in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the application of psychotherapeutic techniques to a group, including the utilization of interactions between members of the group. See also group therapy.
training group sensitivity group.

con·trol group

in a group of subjects participating in the same experiment as another group of subjects, the control group is not exposed to the variable under investigation.
See also: experimental group.

control group

n.
A group used as a standard of comparison in a controlled experiment.

control group

a set of items or people that serves as a standard or reference for comparison with an experimental group. A control group is similar to the experimental group in number and is identical in specified characteristics, such as sex, age, annual income, parity, or other factors, but does not receive the experimental treatment or intervention.

control group

The group of subjects in a controlled clinical trial that receives no treatment, a standard treatment or a placebo.

con·trol group

(kŏn-trōl' grūp)
A group of subjects participating in the same experiment as another group of subjects, but not exposed to the variable under investigation.
See also: experimental group

control group

an identical group of subjects who are unexposed to the experimental variable, to verify investigation or experiment

control group,

n in a clinical trial, the group of subjects that does not receive the active treatment. Having a control group allows comparisons by factoring out confounding variables so that any remaining differences may be attributed to the variable (i.e., the active treatment).

con·trol group

(kŏn-trōl' grūp)
Subjects participating in the same experiment as another group, but not exposed to the variable under investigation.

control group,

n the group of participants in a clinical study who do not receive the drug or treatment being studied against which the reactions of individuals in the experimental group may be compared. See also controlled clinical trial.

control

1. the governing or limitation of certain objects or events.
2. a standard against which experimental observations may be evaluated, as a procedure identical to the experimental procedure except for the one factor being studied; a requirement of any planned experimental study. Also, any individual of the group exhibiting the standard characteristics.

disease control
restraining or reducing the prevalence of individual disease. Includes the range of strategies from limitation of occurrence to eradication. Implies legislative control of notifiable disease.
control elements
nucleotide sequences on DNA that usually precede (upstream) the sequences coding for the structural gene at which regulator proteins act.
control factor
in a comparison between diseases caused by a number of contributing factors it may be necessary to supply controls for one or more of these factors.
control group
the group of animals with which the experimental group is to be matched; the group which has not had its variables manipulated experimentally. The selection of the animals to be included in the two groups may be based on matching them with respect to age, to their history of nutrition or inheritance, or vaccination or prophylactic treatment. Called also controls.
ovulation control
prevention of ovulation by administration of progesterone or stimulation of ovulation by injection of follicle-stimulating hormone are examples.
paired control
comparison between the experimental and control groups is most accurate if the control animal for each experimental animal is selected to be as similar as possible, i.e. a paired control.
control pole
a pole with a noose at the end used to catch and restrain small animals.
control population
a large control group.
population control
a variety of techniques are used with contraception being least used. Permanent surgical interference is common in food, racing and companion animal groups, and termination of pregnancy and estrus synchronization, both by hormonal means, are also extensively practiced. Increasing the culling rate is the standard procedure for dealing with a feed shortage.
x-ray control unit
the controlling mechanisms in an x-ray machine. Include the voltmeter and voltage compensator control, the kilovoltage, milliameter and milliamperage selectors and the timer and exposure control button.
References in periodicals archive ?
In our study, the incidence of caesarean section is 40% in Study group as compared to 20% in Control group and found this difference to be statistically significant (Table 4).
The length of labor was significantly longer in the control group than observation group (pless than 0.
69 for the control group, as well as the transition of the experimental group to the "moderate" assessment level emphasizes the efficiency of the two operation modes and the superiority of the experimental group, at this age.
A critical observation is that the URP students maintained their GPAs, while the students in both control groups earned significantly poorer grades after their initial fall semester (Table 2, URP versus Control Group I, p < 0.
Subjects in the control groups did not receive any weight-loss intervention as part of the study but were free to pursue it on their own.
Differences between the intervention and control groups at baseline were tested using chi-square, t or Wilcox-on rank tests; the effectiveness of the intervention was examined using mixed-effects regression models.
The risk for CIN2 and CIN3 was 30% and 33% lower than in the control group.
Of a possible score of 100 percent, the control group had a mean score of 86.
Four generations and a century later, the Turen family is still at the helm of Control Group.
For example, if the experimental group improves while the control group does not, the difference isn't so easily attributed to factors such as prior achievement or classroom conditions.
The first report (7) looked at the first six months of use, using a study group of 19 primary care physicians in a large multi-specialty clinic, with a similar control group in the same clinic.
33 percent of program participants used Dual compared to 6 percent of Control group