control group

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group

 [gro̳p]
1. an assemblage of objects having certain things in common.
2. a number of atoms forming a recognizable and usually transferable portion of a molecule.
activity g's groups of individuals with similar needs for occupational therapy who are working on the correction of problems that they hold in common.
azo group the bivalent radical, -N=N-.
blood group see blood group.
control group see control (def. 3).
Diagnosis-Related G's see diagnosis-related groups.
encounter group a sensitivity group in which the members strive to gain emotional rather than intellectual insight, with emphasis on the expression of interpersonal feelings in the group situation.
focus g's individuals with a common interest who meet to explore a problem in depth.
PLT group [psittacosis-lymphogranuloma venereum-trachoma] alternative name for genus Chlamydia.
prosthetic group
1. an organic radical, nonprotein in nature, which together with a protein carrier forms an enzyme.
2. a cofactor tightly bound to an enzyme, i.e., it is an integral part of the enzyme and not readily dissociated from it.
3. a cofactor that may reversibly dissociate from the protein component of an enzyme; a coenzyme.
sensitivity group (sensitivity training group) a nonclinical group intended for persons without severe emotional problems, focusing on self-awareness, self-understanding, and interpersonal interactions and aiming to develop skills in leadership, management, counseling, or other roles. Called also T-group and training group.
support group
1. a group made up of individuals with a common problem, usually meeting to express feelings, vent frustrations, and explore effective coping strategies. Education is a component of some support groups.
2. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the use of a group environment to provide emotional support and health-related information for members.
support group (omaha) in the omaha system, regular planned gatherings to accomplish some compatible goal.
group therapy a form of psychotherapy in which a group of patients meets regularly with a group leader, usually a therapist. The group may be balanced, having patients with diverse problems and attitudes, or it may be composed of patients who all have similar diagnoses or issues to resolve. In some groups, patients may be basically mentally healthy but trying to work through external stressors, such as job loss, natural disasters, or physical illness. Self-help groups are groups of people with a commonality of diagnosis (e.g., alcoholism, overeating, or a particular chronic physical illness) or of experience (e.g., rape, incest) and a leader who may be not a therapist but rather one who has experienced a similar problem or situation.

From hearing how the group leader or other members feel about this behavior, the patient may gain insight into his or her anxieties and conflicts. The group may provide emotional support for self-revelation and a structured environment for trying out new ways of relating to people. In contrast, there are other groups that focus on altering behavior, with less or minimal attention paid to gaining insight into the causes of the problems.
therapy group in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the application of psychotherapeutic techniques to a group, including the utilization of interactions between members of the group. See also group therapy.
training group sensitivity group.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

con·trol group

in a group of subjects participating in the same experiment as another group of subjects, the control group is not exposed to the variable under investigation.
See also: experimental group.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

control group

n.
A group used as a standard of comparison in a controlled experiment.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

control group

The group of subjects in a controlled clinical trial that receives no treatment, a standard treatment or a placebo.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

con·trol group

(kŏn-trōl' grūp)
A group of subjects participating in the same experiment as another group of subjects, but not exposed to the variable under investigation.
See also: experimental group
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

con·trol group

(kŏn-trōl' grūp)
Subjects participating in the same experiment as another group, but not exposed to the variable under investigation.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
In Study 1, participants in the threat condition opposed the policy that was advantageous to out-group members more strongly than did those in the control condition. In addition, there was an association between the proposed time of execution of the policy and the participants' responses to the questions regarding the policy.
The Study 1 findings indicate that participants in the symbolic intergroup threat condition had higher switching costs than did those in the control condition, and this effect was moderated by participants' level of group identification.
More specifically, we aimed for the following: (i) determination of brain regions showing an increase or a decrease in blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signals between face processing and control conditions, (ii) determination of PLE in both the resting state and task state in the brain regions associated with face processing, and (iii) correlation of PLE in both the resting and task states with mRT in response to the recognition of an emotional face and control.
Participants were run in blocks, with the 20 induction condition participants first, followed by the 20 control condition participants.
Under control condition, there was 22% increase in the shoot niacin in SB-11 and 18% in ICI-984 with moringa dry leaf extract.
Replicating previous studies (Burke, Martens, and Faucher 2010), in the control condition participants were asked to: (1) briefly describe the emotions that the thought of visiting a dentist arouses in them and (2) jot down, as specifically as they could, what they think will happen to them the next time they have a painful procedure done at the dentist's office.
Similarly, QTL for shoot length under control condition was linked to marker WMC-367 which was also shown by single marker analysis (Table 3).
The duration to exhaustion was significantly shorter under the heat condition than the control condition (16 [+ or -] 2 vs 24 [+ or -] 3 min, respectively), and the MAP was significantly lower and external ear temperature was significantly higher in the heat condition than in the control condition at 16 min of exercise and at exhaustion.
They found that those in the positive control condition and the neutral control condition were not significantly different.
Results from analyses of covariance models show that post-test scores for the intervention condition were significantly higher than those of the control condition on both knowledge and car seat simulation measures.
However, study authors reported a statistically significant interaction between student gender and program participation: Women who participated in the program enrolled in postsecondary education at a rate that was 12 percentage points higher than women in the control condition (63% versus 51%).