contrecoup injury

contrecoup injury

Traumatology A brain 'bruise' diametrically opposite the site of an impacting blow to the cranium, where the head is in motion and the brain lags behind by a split-second; a blow to the back of the head results in lesions of the frontal lobes and horns of the temporal lobes; a blow to the top of the skull results in contrecoup lesions to the hippocampus and the corpus callosum. See Boxing. Cf Coup.
References in periodicals archive ?
[2] They can be single or multiple and can be seen either on the same side of trauma or on the opposite side as a result of contrecoup injury [5].
Mechanisms responsible for retinal break formation in closed globe injury may be as follows: vitreous base avulsion, abnormal sites of vitreoretinal adhesion (e.g., lattice degeneration), coup injury, contrecoup injury at a location opposite to the site of impact, or sudden posterior vitreous detachment induction [15].
Diduch, Bone contusions of the posterior lip of the medial tibial plateau (Contrecoup injury) and associated internal derangements of the knee at MR imaging, Radiology 211 (1999) , pp.
(12) The appendiceal transection in our case is in fact a contrecoup injury due to the opposite primary side of the handlebar harmful contact, which was visible in the left part of the patient's abdomen.
Direct suppression effect towards the cornea may provide a rapid focal collapse over the lens (coup injury) or a quick rebound of the vitreous directed from posterior to anterior causes fluid-mechanical forces that may lead to a rupture of the anterior capsule (contrecoup injury).
(3) We think that the tear of the anterior capsule was likely related to the coup injury, and the rebound of fluid-mechanical forces (contrecoup injury) is probably responsible for the enlargement of the capsule tear.
The mechanics of TBI follow that of coup contrecoup injury. Here there are two types of injury.
Pulmonary parenchymal injury from blunt chest trauma can arise from several mechanisms, including direct compression, contrecoup injury, shearing forces, or laceration from fractured ribs.
Dr Bolster said: "He had what is known as a contrecoup injury which is virtually always associated with a fall.
It is known, however, that blows causing rotation of the brain produce shearing forces, which are tolerated more poorly than either coup or contrecoup injury (11).